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SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 



The Gift of 

cJLojJUa ^{mjauJUb (BMfms 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/microcosm1914sii 



THE CLASS OF 1914 

DEDICATES THIS BOOK 

WITH SINCEREST AFFECTION 

TO 

MRS. AUBREY HILLIARD— OUR MISS HOWARD 



"The secret of happiness is not in doing what one likes, but in liking 
what one has to do." 



Caustii'-Claflin Co. 

Printers 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Che JVIkrocosm 




Cbe Simmons College Hnnual 

PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 
OF SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BOSTON :: :: MASSACHUSETTS 



:% 



VOLUME FIVE 



SIMMONS COLLEGE 

BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 

1914 




^"T^F? 1 "^ 



Jfareroorfc 



Dear rnmrabea, wljen you turn Hjeae leauea, 
Pray, reab with, aymoatlfettr eyes, 
iFor underneath, tye outwaro sense 
A wealty of meaning really lies. 

iflor you must know Iljal, tljottgl} we lauglj, 
Ojhir lanyirrer parly groma ■.more kmb. 
Anb allour tearing, all buruiirtn/ s 
ffane come to he iiutij lotrf combineo. 





iDNTCNTS 




Advertising Section 

Affiliated Houses 

Athletics 
Basketball . 
Tennis 
Track Meet 
Wearers of the S 

Calendar 

Class Baby . 

Classes: 

1914 . 

1915 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

Class Song . 

College Gradltates 
Unclassified Students 

Commencement Week 

Corporation . 



Page 
194 
196 

127 
129 
134 
135 



Page 



Faculty and Administrative Board 

Gaieties 

Good-bye 

Instructors . . . . 

Microcosm Board, 1914 

1 1 Microchaos 

76 Nichols, Dr. Alfred Bull 



Organizations 
Student Guild . 
S. A. A. Executive Comm 
Simmons College Athletic 
Endowment Fund Comm 
Student Government Offi 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Student Conference 
State Clubs 
Musical Association 



ttee . 

Association 
ttee . 
cers . 



12 Statistics, 1914 



107 
109 
110 



119 

125 



It^l 3-o 




Entrance Examinations 
Condition Examinations 
Opening of the College Year 
Guild Reception 
Student Government Reception 
Senior-College Graduate Party 
Senior House Party 
Columbus Day, a holiday 
Junior-Freshman Party 
Sophomore-Senior Luncheon 
Student Government Party 
Sophomores celebrate Hallowe'en 
Tennis Tournament 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Senior-Freshman Party 
Student Government Party 
College Closes at noon. 

CHRISTMAS VACATION 

College opens at 9 A.M. 
End of the first term 
Opening of the second term 
Junior-Sophomore 
Washington's Birthdav, a holiday 
Glee Club Concert 
Senior-Faculty Party 
College closes at noon 



SPRING VACATION 



April 7, 
April 20, 
April 24, 
April 25, 
May 9, 
May 16, 
May 16, 
May 23, 
May 25 — June 5 
May 30, 
June 10, 
June 15-20, 
July 6 — Aug. 15 



College opens at 9 A.M. 

Patriot's Day, a holiday 

Junior Promenade 

Junior Soiree 

Track Meet 

Doubles Tennis Tournament 

Sophomore Luncheon 

Junior-Senior Picnic 

Final Examinations, 

Memorial Day, a holiday 

Commencement Day 

College Entrance Board Exams. 

The Summer Classes 





iy jUxcrorosprT^ 



(jjorporatton 



HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Boston, President 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE, 2d, A.B., Boston, Treasurer 

JOHN WASHBURN BARTOL, A.B., M.D., Boston, Clerk 

FRANCES ROLLINS MORSE, Boston 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.D., Sc.D., Brookline 

JOSEPH BANGS WARNER, A.M., LL.B., Boston 

MARY MORTON KEHEW, Boston 

HORATIO APPLETON LAMB, A.B., Milton 

GEORGE HENRY ELLIS, West Newton 

MARION McGREGOR NOYES, A.M., Winchester 

GUY LOWELL, A.B., S.B., Brookline 

MARY ELEANOR WILLIAMS, Brookline 

EDWARD DESHON BRANDEGEE, A.B., Brookline 





HENRY LEFAVOUR, President. A.B., 
Williams College, 1883; Ph.D., Williams 
College, 1886; LL.D., Williams College, 
1902; Tufts College, 1905; Additional 
course. University of Berlin. 

Formerly : Instructor in Williston Seminary ; Pro- 
fessor and Dean, Williams College ; President of Sim- 
mons College from 1902. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa ; Trustee, Williams Col- 
lege ; Trustee, Boston State Hospital; President, 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts ; Fellow, American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences; Trustee, Society for 
the Preservation of New England Antiquities ; Fellow, 
American Association for the Advancement of Science; 
New England Historic Genealogical Society ; American 
Economic Association ; American Sociological Asso- 
ciation ; Director, Hale House Association; Executive 
Committee, North Bennet Street Industrial School ; 
St. Botolph Club; Boston City Club; City Club of 
New York. 




SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, Dean, Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of Edu- 
cation. A.M., Tufts College. 

Formerly: Principal of Schools, St. Johnsbury. Vt. ; 
Principal of Training School for Teachers, Saratoga, 
N. Y. ; Supervisor of Primary Schools, Minneapolis, 
Minn. ; Supervisor of Schools, Boston, Mass. ; Dean of 
Simmons College from 1902. 

Publications: IVaymarks for Teachers; Reading, 
How to Teach It; Stepping Stones to Literature Series 
(with George L. Kittredge ) ; With Pencil ami Pen; 
The See and Say Series. 

Societies: The Mayflower Club. The Social Edu- 
cation Club, The Executive Committee of Women's 
Education Association, Boston; Member of Board of 
Trustees; Women's Educational and Industrial Union, 
National Council of Education, Massachusetts State 
Board of Education, President of American Association 
of Home Economics. 



JAMES FLACK NORRIS, Professor of 
Chemistry. A.B., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

University; Work at the Technische 
Hochschule Karlsruhe, 1910-1911. 

Formerly: Assistant Professor of Organic Chem- 
istry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1900- 
1904; Lecturer on Organic Chemistry, Harvard Uni- 
versity since 1912. 

Publications: Author of the Principles of Organic 
Chemistry, and about thirty papers on Inorganic and 
Organic Chemistry, published in American and Ger- 
man Chemical Journals. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa, American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences, American Chemical Society. Die 
Deutsche Chemische Gesellschaft, American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, Chemistry Teachers' 
Association of New England, Examiner in Chemistry of 
College Entrance Examiner Board. Technology Club. 

FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, Professor 
of English, A.B., Harvard University, 
1893; A.M., Harvard University, 1894; 
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1897. 

Formerly : Assistant in English, Harvard Univer- 
sity; Assistant in English, Radcliffe College: Instructor 
in English, Haverford College; Professor of English, 
Syracuse University. 

Publications: Author of Scandinavian Influences 
in the English Romantic Movement, 1903; Joint author, 
with George Lyman Kittredge, of an Advanced English 
Grammar, 1913 ; Editor of Milton's Paradise Lost, 
Books I & //. 

MARY SCHENCK WOOLMAN, Acting 
Head of Household Economic Depart- 
ment. B.S., Columbia University, 1897. 

Formerly : Professor of Domestic Art, Teachers' 
College. Columbia University ; Organizer and Director 
of Manhattan Trade School for Girls, New York. 

Publications: Books — Seiviug Course (5th Edition 
1912), F. A. Fernald; The Making of a Trade School, 
Whitcomb & Barrows; Textiles, a Handbook for Stu- 
dent and Consumer, MacMillan, Nov. 1913. Pamphlets 
— Cost and Relative Value of Trades in a Girls' Trade 
School; Trade Schools and Culture; Trade Schools; 
Hints on Dress (For Welfare Exhibit); Training the 
Youngest Wage Earners for Self-support; and others. 

Societies : Business Women's Club, Boston Wom- 
en's City Club, College Club, National Society for the 
Promotion of Industrial Education, Committee for Im- 
proving Urban Conditions among Negroes, American 
Home Economics Association, Alumni Association of 
Teachers' College. 








f 



JEFFREY R. BRACKETT, Professor of 
Social Economy and Director o\f the 
School for Social Workers. A.B., Har- 
vard, 1883: Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1889. 

Formerly : President Department of Charities of 
Baltimore, Md., 1900-04; President National Confer- 
ence of Charities and Correction, 1904; Director of 
School for Social Workers, Boston, from 1904. 

Publications: Supervision and Education in Cliar- 
ity, 1901. 

Member of the Massachusetts State Board of Char- 
ity, Massachusetts Civic League, Ellis Memorial Club, 
and Director of the Boston Associated Charities. 

EDWARD HENRY ELDRIDGE, Profes- 
sor of Secretarial Studies. A.M., Temple 
University, 1903; Ph.D., Temple Univer- 
sity, 1907; Special work in Psychology at 
University of Chicago, University of 
Pennsylvania, Clark University. Two 
years at Amherst College. 

Formerly: Stenographer in a business house; Sec- 
retary to President Gates, Amherst College; Secretary 
to President Conwell, Temple University; Professor 
f Psychology, Temple University; Director of School 
Temple U 



of Busines: 

Publication 
pany, 1910 
Book Compan 



ersity. 
Hypnotism, Penn Publishing Com- 
Shorthand Dictation Exercises, American 
909; Expert Typewriting, co-author 



with Miss Rose L. Fritz. American Book Company, 
1912; Business Speller, American Book Company, 1913- 
Societies: Delta Upsilon ; Vice-President, Alumni 
Association of Temple University ; Ex-President of the 
Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association; Secretary 
of National Shorthand Reporters' Association. 

SUSAN MYRA KINGSBURY, Professor 
of Economics. A.B., University of the 
Pacific; A.M., Leland Stanford Junior 
University; Ph.D.. Columbia University. 

Formerly: Teacher of History in the San Francis- 
co Lowell High School; Instructor in History, Vassar 
College; Supervisor of Investigation under the Mas- 
sachusetts Commission on Industrial and Technical 
Education. . . 

Publications: Records of the Virginia Company, 
Report on the Relation of Children to the Industries. 

Societies: Kappa Alpha Theta Fraternity, Ameri- 
can Historical Association, New England History 
Teachers' Association.* 

*On leave of absence. 



REGINALD RUSDEN GOODELL, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Romance Languages. 
A.B., A.M., Bowdoin College. Additional 
courses, Johns Hopkins University, The 
Sorbonne, L' Alliance Francaise. 

Instructor, Bowdoin College ; Instructor, Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology ; Associate Professor from 
1 002. 

Publications: Editor of V Infant Espion and Other 
Stories. 

Societies: Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Technology Club, Modern Language Association, Salon 
Frangais de Boston. 




CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Library Science. A.B., 
Harvard. 

Librarian Boston Athenaeum. 

Publications: Saskia, the Wife of Rembrandt; The 
Private Soldier under Washington; Scotch Irish 
Pioneers in Ulster and America: Two Chapters in 
A. L. A. Manual of Library Science: Editor, Letters 
of Hugh Earl Percy and of the Athenaeum Centenary. 

Societies: Phi Beta Kappa (honorary) at Harvard: 
President, Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities : Chairman, Visiting Committee to Library 
Museum of Fine Arts ; Member, Visiting Committee 
to Library Harvard University : Trustee of Donations 
for Education in Liberia ; Member. Massachusetts His- 
torical Society; Senior Warden, Christ Church, Boston 
("The Old North"). 




JUNE RICHARDSON DONNELLY, 

Instructor in Reference Work and Book 
Selection. B.S., University of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, 1895; B.L.S., New York State 
Library School, 1907. 

Formerly: Cataloguer and Reference Assistant, 
Cincinnati Public Library; Instructor Library Science, 
Simmons : Director of the Drexel Institute Library 
School and Librarian of Drexel Institute ; Teacher of 
Library Economy, Washington Irving High School, 
New York City. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa, Member A. L. A., Mas- 
sachusetts Library Club. 








FREDERIC AUSTIN OGG, Associate 
Professor of History. A.B., De Pauw 
University, 1899; A.M., University of 
Indiana, 1900; A.M., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1904; Ph.D., Harvard University, 
1908. 

Formerly : Instructor in History, University of In- 
diana, 1902-1903; Fellow and Assistant in History, 
Harvard University, 1904-1907; Instructor in History, 
Simmons College, 1905-1909; Assistant Professor of 
History, Simmons College, 1909-1914. 

Publications: The Opening of the Mississippi (New 
York, Macmillan, 1904) ; Source Book of Medieval His- 
tory (New York, American Book Co., 1908) ; Edited 
Fo'rdham's Narrative of a Journey Through the West., 
1817-1818 (Cleveland, Clark, 1906) ; Social Progress m 
Contemporary Europe (New York, 1912) ; The Gov- 
ernments of Europe (New York, 1913) ; Life of Daniel 
Webster (Philadelphia, 1914). 

Societies : Beta Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kappa, Ameri- 
can Historical Association, American Economic Asso- 
ciation, American Political Science Association, Ameri- 
can Geographic Society, Academy of Political Science 
of the City of New York, Economic Club of Boston. 

EESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, Assistant 
Professor of Physics. M.A., Ph.D., 
Washington and Lee University; A.M., 
Harvard University. 

Formerly: Assistant in Mathematics, Washington 
and Lee University; Assistant in Physics, Harvard 
University; Professor in Physics, Westminster. 

Publications: Thomson Effect, Hall Effect, Nemst 
Effect, Lcduc Effect, Ettingshauscn Effect in Soft Iron, 
Thcrmo-Electric Heterogeneity in Alloys. 

Societies: Fellow, American Association for Ad- 
vancement of Science; American Physical Society, 
Eastern Association of Physics Teachers, Mathematical 
and Physical Club, National Geographical Society, 
Congo Reform Association, Phi Beta Kappa* 

PERCY GOLDTHWAIT STILES, Assis- 
tant Professor of [ Physiology. S.B., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1897; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1902; Post-graduate student at Johns 
Hopkins, 1 899-1 902. 
Instructor, Harvard University, 1913— ■. 
Formerly: Instructor. Bellevue Medical College, 
190^-1903; Instructor, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1903; Instructor, Simmons College, 1904-1907. 
Publications: Nutritional Physiology, Saunders, 
1912; sundrv scientific papers and reviews. 

Societies: American Physiological Society, Society 
for Experimental Biology and Medicine. 
*On leave of absence. 




£e 



ffi 



irroros 



ERNST HERMANN PAUL GROSS- 
MANN, Assistant Professor of German. 
Berlin Normal College; A.B., Harvard 
University, 1902. 

Instructor, Harvard University. 
Formerly : Instructor, Simmons College. 
Societies : Bostoner Deutsche Gesellschaft, Deutscher 
Sprachverein. 



GEORGE PRESTON BACON, Assistant 
Professor of Physics. A.M., Dartmouth 
College. Graduate work at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan and the University of 
Berlin. 

Formerly : Instructor in Science, Peekskill Military 
Academy ; Assistant Principal, Beloit College Academy ; 
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Beloit College ; 
Professor of Physics, University of Wooster. 

Societies : Theta Delta Chi, Phi Beta Kappa, 
American Physical Society, American Astronomical 
and Astrophysical Society. 




SARA HENRY STITES, Instructor in 
Economics. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1899; M. A., 1900; Ph.D., 1904. Student 
in Economics, Geography, and Ethno- 
graphy at the Sorbonne and at the College 
de France, 1900-1901 ; University of 
Leipzig, 1 901-1902. 

Formerly : Co-principal of the Wilkes-Bai re In- 
stitute, 1901-1912. 

Puhlications : Economics of the Iroquois, 1904. 





ffiV jlirroc osjf 




KENNETH LAMARTINE MARK, As- 
sistant Professor of Chemistry. A.B., 
Harvard, 1898; A.M., Harvard, 1900; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1903. 

Formerly : Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard Uni- 
versity ; Instructor in Chemistry, Simmons College ; 
Assistant Professor, Simmons College, from 1906. 

Publications : Thermal Expansion of Gases. 

Societies : Delta Upsilon, American Chemical 
Society. 



MARIA WILLETT HOWARD, Assistant Professor of Household 
Economics. 

Formerly: Principal of Boston Cooking School; Lecturer on Home Economics. 

CHARLES MARSHALL UNDERWOOD, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages. A.B., Harvard, 1900; A.M., Harvard, 1901 ; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1905. University of Paris; University of Gren- 
oble. 

Formerly: Instructor, Harvard University; Dartmouth College; University of Cincin- 
nati; Simmons College; Assistant Professor, Simmons College, from 1908. 

JAMES HOLLY HANFORD, Assistant Professor of English. A.B., 
University of Rochester, 1904; A.M., Harvard, 1907; Ph.D., Har- 
vard, 1909. 

Formerly: Teacher of English, East High School, Rochester, N. Y., 1904-6; Instruc- 
tor in English, Harvard, 1911-13. , , 

Publications : Various articles in publications of the Modem Language Association of 
America and elsewhere. 

Societies: Psi Upsilon, Modern Language Association of America. 

ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, Assistant Professor in Chemistry, and 
Executive Secretary, Home Economics Department. S.B., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, 1903 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 19 10. 

Formerly: Private Assistant to Dr. S. P. Mulliken, 1903-1904; Instructor in Simmons 

Publications : Some Peculiarities of the Proteolytic Activity of Pa p pain (with L. B. 
Mendel); The Erepsin of the Cabbage. _ . . 

Societies: Sigma XI; American Chemical Society; Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 
Association of the Women of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; American Home 
Economics Association. 



20 



SOPHRONIA MARIA ELLIOTT, Assistant Professor of Household 
Economics. A.M., Brown. 

Formerly: Providence and Boston Public Schools; School of Housekeeping, Boston; 
Simmons College, 1902 — . 

Publications: Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning (joint author with Mrs. Ellen H. 
Richards); Household Bacteriology ; Household Hygiene, articles in magazines and papers. 

Societies: Health Education League, Teachers' School of Science, Women of Tech- 
nology Association, New England Home Economics Association, American Home Economics 
Association, International Congress on School Hygiene.* 

ZILPHA DREW SMITH, Assistant Professor of Social Economy. 

General Secretary, Associated Charities of Boston, for about twenty-five years. 

Publications : Occasional articles in National Conference of Charities, The Survey, etc. 

Societies : Monday Evening Club, Board of Tuckerman School, one of Trustees of 
Esther Hawks Trust (educational), now and then Examiner for Civil Service positions re- 
lated to Social Work. 

SELSKAR M. GUNN, Assistant Professor of Biology. S.B., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, 1905. 

Assistant Professor of Sanitary Biology and Public Health, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology since 1911; Lecturer on Hygiene at Tufts Medical College since 1911. 

Formerly: Bacteriologist in the Boston Biochemical Laboratory, 1905-10x16; Bacteriolo- 
gist to the Iowa State Board of Health, Lecturer on Hygiene in the University of Iowa, 
1906-1908; Health Officer, Orange, N. J., 1908-1910; Instructor in Sanitary Biology, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, 1910-1911. 

Publications: Managing editor of the American Journal of Public Health. 

Societies: Secretary of the American Public Health Association, Member of several 
Scientific Societies. 

CHARLES FOREST RITTENHOUSE, Assistant Professor of Secre- 
tarial Studies. Graduate of the Department of Business of Scio 
College, 1902; Zanerian Art College, Ohio; Special work in Account- 
ing and Business Administration in Boston School of Commerce and 
Finance. 

Formerly: Head of the commercial department of Northampton Commercial School, 
Mass., 1903-1910; Instructor in Penmanship in Miss Capen's School for Girls, Northampton, 
Mass., for five years; Instructor in the High School of Commerce, Boston, for two years. 

Societies: Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association, New England High School Com- 
mercial Teachers' Association, Universal Society of Accountants, Inc. 

ELLA JOSEPHINE SPOONER, Assistant Professor of Domestic Art. 
Graduate of Framingham Normal School ; Harvard Summer School, 
1898 and 1913; Simmons College, 1 905-1906; Columbia Summer 
School, 1909 and 191 1. 

Formerly : Instructor, Perkins Institution for the Blind ; Private Teaching, Boston 
Trade School for Girls, Andover Guild Evening Classes; Andover Guild Summer School, 
1908 and 1910 

Societies: American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics 
Association, Eastern Manual Training and Art Teachers' Association, Society for the Pro- 
motion of Industrial Education. Alumnae Council of Framingham Normal School, National 
Education Association. 




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GERTRUDE WILLISTON CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Secretarial 
Studies. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Formerly : Secretary, President National Biscuit Company ; Secretary, Advertising 
Manager Review of Reviezvs; Secretary, Commercial Department American Book Company. 
Societies: Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association. 

ARTHUR STONE DEWING, Assistant Professor of Economics. A.B., 
Harvard University, 1902 ; A.M., Harvard University, 1903 ; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1905. 

Lecturer in Corporation Economics, Yale University ; Head of Department of Economics 
in Boston School of Commerce and Finance. 

■ Formerly : Assistant in Philosophy and Instructor in Economics. 

Publications: Books — History Modern Philosophy: Life as Reality; Laboratory Note 
Bnnks in Chemistry and Biology; The Reorganisation of the National Cordage Company; 
The Promotion and Reorganization of Industrial Corporations. Periodicals — Articles on 
Science Teaching in School Science and Education; articles on Mendel's Law and Heredity 
in American Naturalist, and similar publications; articles on Modern Philosophy in 
Philosophical Review; articles on Logical Subjects in Journal of Philosophy, Psychology, 
and Scientific Methods; articles on Corporation Finance in Quarterly Journal of Economics. 

Societies: American Economics Association; Director, Boston School of Commerce and 
Finance. 

FLORENCE S. DIALL, Assistant Professor of Physical Training. 
Graduate of Sargent Normal School of Physical Education; Woods 
Hole Marine Biological Laboratory, De Pauw University. 

/. C. A., Terre Haute, Ind. ; Instructor, Vassal' 

ion Association, Kappa Alpha Phi. 

HARRY MAXWELL VARRELL, Instructor in History. A.B., Bow- 
doin College, 1897; A.M., 1900; A.M., Harvard University, 1909; 
Ph.D., 1912. 

Formerly: Instructor in University of New Mexico, 1897-189S; Instructor in Univer- 
sity of Colorado, 1899-1901; Brooklyn Latin School, 1901-1902; Pueblo High School, 1904- 
1908; Austin Teaching Fellow, Harvard University, 1909-1912. 

Societies: Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Beta Kappa, American Historical Association, 
National Geographic Society. 

ALICE NORTON DIKE, Instructor in Household Economics. B.L., 
Smith College; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; School of 
Housekeeping. 

Formerly: Teacher, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Teacher, School of House- 
keeping, Boston ; Experiments and Recipes in Cookery I, Simmons College, 1912.* 

MARGARETA ELWINA MITZLAFF, Instructor in German. 
German Government Diploma as Teacher in Higher Schools. 

Formerly : Instructor in a Private School ; Instructor, Wellesley College. 
Societies: Bostoner Deutsche Gesellschaft. 

*On leave of absence. 



Formerly 


: Ph 


vsical Director Y 


College. 






Societies: 


Ame 


•ican Physical Ed 




be jfficvorosT) 




EVA LOUISE MARGUERITE MOTTET (Brevet Superieur), Instruc- 
tor in French. A.M., Radcliffe; College of Montbeliard, P'rance. 

Formerly: Instructor, Wellesley College. 

MARION EDNA BOWLER, Instructor in Romance Languages. B.A., 
University of Idaho, 1909; M.A., Radcliffe College, 191 2: Univer- 
sity of Paris; Guilde Internationale; University Grenoble, France. 

Formerly: Instructor in French, Simmons College, 10,05-1908: Mead French Teacher, 
Kent Place, Summit, N. J.. 1910-1911; Instructor in French, Wellesley College, 1911-1912. 
Societies : Gamma Phi Beta. 

MYRA COFFIN HOLBROOK, Instructor in English. A.B., Vassar; 
A.M., Wesleyan. 

Formerly: Virginia College. Va., Wesleyan Academy. Wilbraham, Mass. 

JANE BOIT PATTEN, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, 1906; Additional courses at Technische 
Hochschule, Dresden, Germany; Course at the Marine Biological 
Laboratory, Woods Hole; Course at the Botanical Garden and 
Experiment Station, Dresden, Germany. 

ELIZABETH ALLISON STARK, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
A.B., Wellesley College; S.B., Simmons College. 

Formerly: Assistant to Registrar, Wellesley College; Secretary to President's Secre- 
tary, Wellesley College. 

B. MARION BROWN, Instructor in Organic Chemistry. B.S., Simmons 
College, 1907; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1913. 

Formerly: Instructor in Chemistry, Simmons College, 1907-1911. 
Societies: American Chemistry Society. 

BEULAH CLARK HATCH, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., 
Simmons College. 

Instructor in Domestic Science, Pennsylvania State College. 

LAURA KATHERINE JOHNSON, Instructor in Physics. A.B., Cor- 
nell University. Additional courses at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa. 



MARY BOSWORTH STOCKING, Instructor in Household Economics. 
B.S., Simmons College. 

Formerly : Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111. ; Assistant in Household Economics, Sim- 
mons College ; Teacher of Domestic Science, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Lectures, 
Private Classes. 

Societies: American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics 
Association, Simmons Club of Boston. 

RUTH BRYANT, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Simmons, 1909. 

MARGARET COFFIN, Instructor in Household Economics. A.B. 
University of Tennessee; B.S., Columbia University; Psychology and 
History, Summer School of the South. 

Formerly: Instructor at College for Women, Columbia, S. C. ; Assistant, Teachers' 
College, Columbia University ; Director of Domestic Science, Y. W. C. A., Omaha, Nebr. 

Societies : American Association of Home Economics, American School of Homt 
Economics, Chi Omega, Phi Kappa Phi, Women's Educational and Industrial Union. 



CHARLES WILLIAM LEMMI, Instructor in English. M.A., Harvard; 
Diploma, R. Istituto Tecnico G. Galilei, Florence, Italy. 

Formerly : Section-master and Instructor in French and Nature-Study at Camp 
Marienfeld, New Hampshire. 

Publications: Some translations in Rivisa Fiorentina, and a little poem in Atlantic 
Monthly. 

MARIE G. LUNDBERG, Supervisor of the Teaching of Household 
Economics in Social Settlements. Framingham Normal School ; One- 
year special course at Simmons; Summer course at the University of 
Vermont; Summer course at Cornell University. 
Grade work in the Public Schools of Northampton, New Bedford, and Waltham. 

LILLIAN AZUBAH PHILLIPS, Instructor in Domestic Art. Smith 
College; Mass. Normal Art School, Diploma Industrial Art Course; 
Fitchburg Normal School; Summer courses at Columbia, 1905-1911 ; 
Studied problem of Industrial Education in Europe, 1907. 

Formerly: Supervisor of Drawing, Woonsocket. R. I.; Supervisor of Manual Arts, 
Fitchburg State Normal School. 

Publications: Magazine articles on Elementary Handwork. 

Societies : Eastern Drawing and Manual Training Teachers' Association ; National 
Society for Promotion of Industrial Education ; Smith College Club, Philotechnian. 

HANS WOLDO RABE, Instructor in German. A.B., c.L, Harvard 
University; Graduate work at Harvard from 191 1. 

Formerly : Instructor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1907-1908. 
Societies : Harvard Deutsche Verein, Modern Language Association, Sprachverein. 



CECILIA MINNA SILLCOX, Instructor in Chemistry. 
College, 1908; M.A., Columbia University, 191 1. 

Formerly: Assistant in Chemistry, Barnard College, 1909-191 1. 
Societies: Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority. 



A.B., Barnard 



Instructor in English. 



CHARLOTTE FARRINGTON BABCOCK, 
Radcliffe, A.B.; A.M., Ph.D. 

Teacher at Miss Carroll's School, Boston; Teacher at Misses Smith's School, Cam- 
bridge; Private Tutoring; Assistant in English at Simmons College, 1911-1912. 
Societies : Radcliffe Alumna; Association, Radcliffe Union. 

ANNA G. DAVIS, Instructor in Sewing. Diploma in Domestic Art, 
School of Domestic Science of Boston, Y.W.C.A., 1907; Diploma 
in Domestic Science, 1908. Chicago University Summer School, 
19 10; Teachers' College, 191 1. 

Chicago University Summer School, 1910 ; Teachers' College, 191 1. 
Instructor in Boston Y. W. C. A. School of Domestic Science, 1908-1912. 

GRACE HILL, Instructor in Library Science. Ph.B., Grinnell College, 
Iowa, 1906; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 191 2; Courses 
at Iowa Summer Library School, 1906, 1908. 

Formerly: Assistant in Grinnell College Library, 1902-1907; Librarian in Oskaloosa, 
Iowa, 1907-1909; Branch Librarian of the Queensborough Library, New York City, 1909- 
1911. 



BERTHA MARION PILLSBURY, Instructor in English and Secretary 
of the Faculty. A.B., University of Illinois; A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe 
College. 



Formerly: Instructor in English, University of Illinois, 1904-1906; Reader 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-1908. 

Societies : Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 



English. 





ABBY L. SARGENT, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. Salem Normal 
School. 

Medford Public Library. 

Formerly : Librarian, Wilmington, N. C. ; Middlesex Mechanics Association, Lowell. 
Societies: American Peace Society, Appalachian Mountain Club, Massachusetts Library 
Club, American Library Association, National Geographic Society. 

EDITH ARTHUR BECKLER, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 



AMY M. SACKER, Instructor in Housebuilding-Design. Principal of 
The Amy H. Sacker School of Design for Women. 

Societies: Society of Arts and Crafts, Copley Society. 

ELIOT THWING PUTNAM, Lecturer on Architecture. A.B., Harvard 

University. 

ALICE MABEL JORDAN, Instructor in Library Science. 

Chief of Children's Department, Boston Public Library. 

BLANCHE LEANORD MORSE, Instructor in Design. A.B., Smith, 
1892. 

Interior Decorator. . . 

Formerly: At Miss Amy M. Sacker' s School of Decorative Design. 

ABBY JOSEPHINE SPEAR, Instructor in Millinery. Special Courses, 
Columbia University, N. Y., Summer Session, 191 1 ; Special Courses, 
Harvard University, Summer Session, 1913. 

Instructor in Millinery at The Garland School of Homemaking, Boston. 
Societies: New England Home Economics Association. 



CAROLINE DAVIS ABORN, Instructor in the Psychology of Child Life. 

Director of Kindergartens, Boston, Mass. 

Societies: Twentieth Century Club, Boston: International Kindergarten Union; Bos- 
ton Teachers' Club; New England Federation of Kindergarten Clubs.* 

F. MELBOURNE GREENE, Lecturer on the Appreciation of Art, 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts. B.L., University of California, 1892 ; 
Ph.D., Berlin, 1908. 

The Appreciation of Art, twenty lectures; The History of Art, thirty lectures. 
Formerly: University Extension Lecturer, University of California, 1901. 
Publications: In the course of completion — The Work of Art: a System of Aesthetic 
Appreciation. 

JULIA HARVEY BRADLEY, Instructor in Dressmaking. 

Teacher of Dressmaking at Emmanuel House. 

Formerly: Designer for Grueby, Faience Co., 1900-1907. 

Societies : Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

CHARLES FRANCIS DORR BELDEN, Lecturer on Public Documents. 
LL.B., Harvard, 1898. 

Librarian, State Library of Massachusetts; Chairman, Free Public Library Commission 
of Massachusetts; Vice-President, League of Library Commissions. 

FRANCES T. E. BOYD, Instructor in Institutional Management. 
Course in Institutional Management, Simmons, 1908. 

Formerly: House Superintendent and Bursar at St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. 

ELIZABETH M. GOODRICH, Instructor in Institutional Management 
and House Superintendent of the Simmons College Dormitories. 
Traveled in England and Europe. 

Formerly: Assistant House Superintendent, Simmons College. 

EVA W. WHITE, Instructor in the School for Social Workers. B.S., 
Simmons, 1907. 

Head Worker, Elizabeth Peabody Home; Special Agent, Massachusetts Board of Ed- 
ucation. 

So:ieties: Twentieth Century Club, Monday Evening Club, Women's City Club, New 
England Home Economics Association. 

EMMA B. MATTESON, Instructor in Cookery. B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 191 1. 

Formerly : Pratt Institute ; Summer School, Middlebury College, Vt. ; State Normal 
School, Winona, Minn. 

*On leave of absence. 



MARY HALEY MORAN, Instructor in Lunch Room Management. 
Business Training and Experience in Stenography, Book-keeping, 
Office Management, and in Settlement and Social Work. 

Director of the New England Kitchen, Women's Educational and Industrial Union. 
Ten years in the employ of the Union : eight vears in the Lunch Dept. of the New England 
Kitchen. 

Societies : President of Business Women's Club. 

MAY ALLINSON, Instructor in Economics. A.B., University of Illinois, 
1906; A.M., 1907. 

Associate Director, Research Dept. Women's Educational and Industrial Union. 
Societies : Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Chi Omega, Phi Delta Psi, American Economics 
Association. 

GERTRUDE FRANCES BARBOUR, Assistant in Biology. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 1910; S.M., Simmons College, 191 1. 

Sewing Classes. Quincy Evening School ; Sewing and Cooking Classes, Misses Allen's 
School for Girls, West Newton. 

MARGERY BOYLSTON, Instructor in Biology. B.S., Simmons College, 
1908. 

Formerly: Assistant in Biology, Simmons College, 1908-1909; Instructor, Packer In- 
stitute, Brooklyn, 1909-1910. 

ROBERT M. BROOKFIELD, Instructor in Business Law and Methods. 
West Point, 1896; Commissioned in the United States Army; LL.B., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1904. 

Formerly: Member of Philadelphia Bar; Professor of Commercial Law, Central High 
School, Philadelphia ; Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Girard College, Philadelphia. 
Societies: Past Master Lodge 51 F.A.M. 

FRANCES WENTWORTH CUTLER, Instructor in English. B.A., 
Vassar College, 1909; M.A., University of Maine, 19 13. 

Formerly: Teacher at Brantwood Hall, Bronville, N. Y. ; Putnam Hall, Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa. 

EMMA BELLE DEARBORN, Instructor in the Summer Secretarial 
Classes. 

BERTHA METCALF EMERSON, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
S.B., Simmons College, 1910. 

Formerly: Assistant to the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society; Secretarial 
Assistant in the President's Office at Harvard University. 

28 




the ffi 



.trtoros 




AMY FACKT, Assistant in Household Economic: 
College, 1903; B.S., Simmons College, 1912. 



linois Woman's 



Boston Cooking 



MARIAN GAGE, Instructor in Household Economic 
School; Physics at Columbia Summer School. 

Formerly : Assistant Dietitian, State Sanitarium, Rutland, Mass. ; Teacher of Cookery, 
Boston Public School; Teacher of Cookery, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Assistant 
in Household Economics, Simmons College. 

Societies : New England Home Economics, National Economics Association. 

HELEN GOLLER, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. A.B., Wellesley 
College; B.S., Simmons College. 

Formerly : Secretarial position in Philadelphia. 

RALPH VOLNEY HARLOW, Instructor in History. A.B., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1909; M.A., Yale University, 191 1 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 
I9I3- 

Formerly: Mr. Leal's School. Plainfield, N. J., 1909-1910. 
Societies: Phi Beta Kappa, American Historical Association. 



THERESA HITCHLER, Instructor in Library Science. 
Head Cataloguer, Public Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RAYMOND G. LAIRD, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. B.C.S., New 
York University, 1893; C.P.A. 

Formerly : Eastman College, Poughkeepsie ; DeWitt Clinton High School, New York 
City; High School of Commerce, New York City; High School of Commerce, Boston. 

Societies : Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association, New England Commercial 
Teachers' Association, New England Penmanship Supervisors' Association, Zanerian Pen- 
manship Association, Boston High School Masters' Club, Boston School Men's Club, Con- 
necticut State Society of Certified Public Accountants. 

Publications : Sundry articles in professional magazines. 



GEORGE AUGUSTUS LINHART, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B. 
City College of Philadelphia, 1906; B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
1909; A.M., Yale University, 1911; Ph.D., Yale University, 1913 

Formerly: Instructor at the Central Y. M. C. A. Institute, Philadelphia, 1906-1909 
Assistant Instructor in the Kent Chemical Laboratory of Yale University, 1910-1913. 

Publications: Articles on the Hydrolysis of Alkyl Metallic Sulphates: XXXII, 51 
XXXIV, 290; 539; XXV, 283 in the American Journal of Science— Articles on the Rate o 
Reduction of Mercuric Chloride by Phosphorous Acid: XXXV, 353 in the American Journa 
of Science — Articles on the Instantaneous Transformation of Mercuric Compounds to Calo 
mel, and the Application of this Process in Cases of Mercuric Poisoning in the New Yor 
Medical Journal. 

Societies : Member of the Yale Chapter of the Sigma XI, Research Fellow at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Physical Chemistry Department. 



29 



PHILIP WESTON MESERVE, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B., Bowdoin 
College, 191 1 ; Harvard University, 1911-12; Johns Hopkins 
University, 191 2-13. 

Societies : Psi Upsilon, American Chemical Society, Gamma Alpha Scientific Society. 

HELEN MONSCH, Instructor in Home Economics — Cookery and Diete- 
tics. S.B., Kansas Agricultural College, 1904; S.B., University of 
Chicago, 1909. 

Formerly: Assistant in Domestic Science, Kansas Agricultural College, 1905-1906; 
Assistant in Domestic Science at Chicago School of Domestic Arts and Sciences, 1907-1909; 
Teacher of Domestic Science at Hull House, Chicago, 1907-1909; Head of the Domestic 
Science Dept., Gary Public Schools, Gary, Ind., 1909-1913. 

ETHEL NEWLANDS, Instructor in Cooking. Graduate of Pratt 
Institute, 1905. 

Formerly: Instructor, Johns Hopkins Hospital Training School for Nurses, 1905-1908: 
Instructor, Pratt Institute, 1908-1910; Instructor, New Haven, Conn., and Buffalo, N. Y., 
1910-1913. 

FRED GEORGE NICHOLS, Instructor in the Summer Secretarial 
Classes. 



HARRIET ANNA NIEL, Instructor in the Psychology of Child Life. 

ARTHUR F. O'MALLEY, Instructor in Commercial Branches, Summer 
Secretarial School. A.B., Dartmouth, 1897; A.M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 191 1 ; Master's Diploma in Education, Teachers' College, 
1911. 

High School of Commerce, Boston. 

Formerly : Assistant Principal, Gardner, Mass. ; High School Principal, Gardner, Mass. : 
Evening Schools, Head of Commercial Department, Wakefield, Mass.; High School, Head 
of Commercial Department, Brockton. Mass ; High School and Principal of Evening High 
School, Commercial Department, West Roxbury High School, Boston, Mass.; Junior Master, 
Department Business Technique, High School of Commerce, Boston, Mass. 

Societies : Phi Delta Theta, N. H. Alpha. 



CASSIE LUCRETIA PAINE, Instructor i 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, 



1 Salesmanship. Diploma, 
1912. 



Lecturer in Pedagogy, Applied Psychology, and Textiles. 

Formerly : Teacher in Public Schools of Massachusetts and New York ; Model Teacher 
in Practice School, Salem, Mass. ; Supervisor of Practice Teaching, State Normal School, 
Salem, Mass. 

Publications: An article on Arithmetic; Elementary School Teacher, April, 1913. 

Societies: Helmet Club, the Women's Club of Teachers' College, Columbia University. 



30 



EUGENE LYMAN PORTER, Instructor in Physiology. A.B., Harvard 
University, 1904; M.A., University of Michigan, 1908; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 191 2; One summer at the University of Chi- 
cago; One summer at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods 
Hole. 

Formerly: Assistant Professor of Biology and Geology at Transylvania University, 
Lexington, Ky. ; Professor of Biology and Chemistry at Adrian College. Adrian, Mich'; 
Austin Teaching Fellow, Physiology, Harvard Medical School. 

Publications: Thresholds of Electrical Stimulation in the Spinal Cat, Determined by 
the Martin Method, published in the American Journal of Physiology, Vol. XXXI, No. Ill": 
Variations in Irritability of the Reflex Arc. — I. Variations under Asphyxial Conditions, 
with Blood-gas Determinations, published in the same journal. Vol. XXXI, No. IV: The 
Sensory Threshold for Faradic Stimulation in Man (in collaboration with E. G. Martin and 
L. B. Nice) published in the Psychological Review, Vol. XX, No. III. 

LUCINDA WYMAN PRINCE, Lecturer on Salesmanship. 

ANTOINETTE ROOF, Supervisor of Practice, Women's Educational and 
Industrial Union. Graduate of Framingham Normal School. 

Formerly: Teacher in grammar schools in Pennsylvania, Waltham, Mass., Newton, 
Mass. ; Instructor in Royal Normal College for the Blind, London ; Principal of Practice 
Department and Supervisor of Practice in State Normal School, Framingham, Mass. 

MARY ELIZABETH STAFFORD ROOT, Instructor in the Summer 
Library Classes. 

Formerly: Children's Librarian, Providence Public Library. 

CHARLES FREEMAN ROWLEY, Instructor in Commercial Lav.-. 
A.B., Harvard, 1905; LL.B., Flarvard, 1907. 

Formerly: General practice; Assistant in Economics, Harvard. 

FLORENCE C. SARGENT, Instructor in Chemistry. S.B., Simmons 
College, 191 1. 

Formerly: Research Assistant at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

ELMER RAYMOND SCHAEFFER, Instructor in Physics. A.B., Har- 
vard, 19 13; Westfield College, Illinois; Columbia Summer School. 

Formerly: Instructor in Mathematics, Westfield Academy, 1907-1908; Instructor in 
Physics and Chemistry, Olney High School, Illinois, 1908-1910. 

MADELAINE LUELLAH SCOTT, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
B.S., Simmons College, 191 1. 

Societies:' Phi Gamma Ki. 



IDA ALICE SLEEPER, A.M., Instructor in English. 

EMMA R. SOUTHWORTH, Instructor in Cooking. A.B., Mount 
Holyoke College, 1902. 

Formerly : Offord School, Maiden, Mass. ; Derby Academy, Hingham, Mass. ; Tech- 
nical High, Springfield, Mass. 

MARGUERITE DOROTHEA TSCHALER, Instructor in Physics. 
A.B., Boston University, 1911; A.M., Boston University, 19 13. 

Formerly : Cambridge Evening Schools. 

Societies : Epsilon Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa, Gamma Gamma Delta, Massachu- 
setts Society for the University Education of Women. 

JENNIE BLAKENEY WILKINSON, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
B.S., Simmons College, 191 1. 

PHILIP G. WRIGHT, Instructor in the School for Social Workers. 
A.B., Tufts College, 1884; A.M., Harvard, 1887. 

Instructor in Economics, Harvard University. 

Formerly: Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, Buchtel College, 1884-1886; Professor 
of Mathematics and Economics, Lombard College, 1892-1912 ; Instructor in Economics, 
Williams College. 1912-1913. 

Societies: Theta Delta Chi. 

HELEN JACKSON, A.B., S.B., Assistant in Secretarial Studies. 

FRANCES ROUSMANIERE DEWING, Assistant in Psychology and 
Ethics. A.B., Wellesley, 1900; A.M., Wellesley, 1904; Ph.D., 
Radcliffe, 1906. 

Formerly: Instructor in Mathematics and Philosophy at Mt. Holyoke College; Instruc- 
tor in Philosophy at Smith College. 

Publications: Two articles in the Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific 
Methods; article in Vol. II of Harvard Psychological Studies. 

Societies : American Philosophical Association, American Psychological Association, 
Association for the Advancement of Science, Agra Society of Wellesley College. 

MARTHA WELLS HENRY, Assistant in Household Economics. 

One-year Institutional Management at Simmons College. 
Teaching, Charlemont, Mass. 

HELEN LUITWIELER, Assistant in the Library. A.B., Smith College, 
19 10. One-year college graduate course at Simmons College. 

Formerly : Apprentice for two months in the Springfield City Library ; Assistant for 
one month for the Massachusetts Free Public Library Commission. 

32 



CANEMA BOWERS, Assistant in Chemistry. S.B., Simmons College, 
1912. 

IDA M. CANNON, Instructor in the School for Social Workers. Train- 
ing School for Nurses, City and County Hospital, St. Paul, Minn., 
1897; School for Social Workers, Boston, 1907. 

Formerly : Head Worker in the Social Service Department of the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

Publications: Social Work in Hospitals, published by the Russell Sage Foundation. 

Societies: American Association for Labor Legislation; National Child Labor Com- 
mittee; National Public Health; Nursing Association, etc. 

CHRISTIAN CARL CARSTENS, Instructor in Organizing Charity. 
A.B., Grinnell, 1891; A.M., Pennsylvania, 1900'; Ph.D., Pennsyl- 
vania, 1903. 

Secretary, Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty -to Children since 1907; Lecturer, 
Social Ethics Dept., Flarvard University. 

Formerly: Principal of High School, Marshalltown, Iowa, 1896-1899; Assistant Sec- 
retary, Philadelphia Society for Organizing Charity, 1900-1903; Assistant Secretary, New 
York Charity Organization Society, 1003-1907. 

Publications : Public Pensions to ]Vidon , s, published bv Russell Sage Foundation, New 
York. 

MARY BEARD, Instructor in Public Health Nursing. Graduate of the 
New York Hospital Training School for Nurses. New York Lying- 
in Hospital. 

Director, Instructive District Nursing Association. 

Formerly: Head of Visiting Nursing Association at Waterbury, Conn.; Laboratory 
assistant Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Laboratory of Surgical 
Pathology. 

Societies : Ahunme New York Hospital Training School for Nurses ; National League 
for Nursing Education ; American Nurses Association ; National Organization for Public 
Health Nursing; Massachusetts State Association of Nurses. 

ELEANOR WEBSTER BROWNE, Assistant in Chemistry. A.B., 
Radcliffe, 1912; B.S., Simmons, 1913. 

OLIVE E. DIALL, Assistant in Cookery. S.B., Simmons College, 1913. 

OLIVE FRENCH, Assistant in Library Science. B.S., Simmons College, 
1912. 

Formerly : Secretary to the Library Department, Simmons College. 

HELEN HALL, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. A.B., Welles College, 
1907. 

Formerly: Private Secretary to the Bishop of Minnesota, the Rt. Rev. S. C. Edsall. 
Societies: Alphi Phi. 



ETHEL HOBART, Instructor in Community work at the School for Social 
Workers. Special work at Radcliffe College, 1899-1900 and 1902- 
1903. 

Formerly: English Reader, Dana Hall School; Society of Massachusetts Association 
of Women Workers. 

Publications: Stories and verse in the Nezv England Magazine, the Outlook, Scnbners , 
etc. 

KATE McMAHON, Special Assistant, School for Social Workers. 

WILDA C. STRONG PECK, Assistant in Library Science. Western 
Reserve University Library School, 1908; Simmons College, 191 1- 
1912. 

Formerly : First assistant, Perkins Children's Library, Alliance Branch Library, Cleve- 
land Public "Library; Cataloguer, Boston Athenaeum Library. 



Political Sc 



Club, Lynn, 



.S., Simmons 



LILLIE M. PECK, Assistant in Household Management. 
College, 1913. 

ELIZABETH FRENCH PLATTS, Instructor in Sewing. S.B., Simmons 
College, 1913. 

MARGARET RIDLON, Assistant in Library Science. B.S., Simmons 
College, 1912. 
Formerly: Reorganize^ Langdon Public Library, Newington, N. H. ; Reference As- 
sistant, Williams College. 

JANET RITCHIE, Instructor in Design. Amy M. Sacker School of 
Design. 

EVELYN WALKER, Secretary of the Faculty. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College. 
Formerly: Secretary, Bryn Mawr College; Assistant Secretary, Miss Winsor's School.* 
*On leave of absence. 





ALFRED BULL NICHOLS 

1852-1913 



1914 Gllais* §>0ttg 



By BARBARA WALKER 







JW-fa-s o/T m y»u i^ tfei. h.0, ™» i"-/ « - "^ """ 



n 



<ftf*2 












> 



(ElaBS of 1914 




(ifficprs 





Ava S. Bassett 








President 






Margaret A. Potter 






Anita Q. Clark 


Vice-President 


Ruth B. Klein 
Treasurer 

Executive Board 




Secretary 


Agnes Hatch 




M 


arion Andrews 


Agnes Gartland 




G 


:rtrude Baker 





GLADYS L. ABBOTT 

Gladys Abbott, Gladys Abbott, 
Has a very "taking" habit. 
Always grabs the basketball, 
And for her an "A" will fall. 

Franklin, Mass. 

Track, Basketball, Manager of Track Team (3), Manager 

Basketball Team (4) 
Secretarial Studies 



HELEN M. ANDERSON 

Our tennis champion, who lifts for us the "cup 
that cheers but r.ot inebriates." 

2cS S. Fifteenth Street, La Crosse, Wis. 

Class Vice-President (1), S.A.A. Treasurer (1 and 2), 

Tennis, Basketball— Varsity Manager of Basketball Team 

(1), Captain (2) 
School for Social Workers 



MARION ANDREWS 

If Marion ever gets a chance, we often hear her 

say, 
She'll surely change her name to one that won't 

begin with A, 
For she is always called on first. "Alas! and 

why," moans she, 
"Could not my name have been begun with Q 

or X or Z?" 

Holliston, Mass. 

Class Treasurer (2),. Executive Committee (4), Senior 

Prom. Committee (4) 
Library Science 



CONSTANCE ASHENDEN 

If there is anything about a recitation that 
Constance does not understand, it is not her fault. 

127 Oakleigh Road, Newton, Mass. 
Library Science 



ROSAMUND W. ASHLEY 

"You seem at ease most anywhere 
Apparently without a care." 

217 Country Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

Baseball 

Household Economics 



HELEN G. ATKINS 
Speak up, Helen, and let us know you better. 



IS Bromfield Street, Wollaston, Mass. 
Secretarial Studies 





MILDRED ATKINSON 

"Sweetest little maiden, everybody knows, 
Doan know what to call her but she's 
mighty lak a rose." 

164 E. Foster Street, Melrose, Mass. 
Household Economics 



HORTENSE F. ATWOOD 
'Cookery has become an art — a noble science. 



Natick, Mass. 
Household Economics 



DORIS L. AVER 

If a Freshman were to blunder into one of 
Doris's closets by mistake, she might think that 
she was in the exhibition room of some fashionable 
down-town shop. 

Plymouth, N. H. 
Household Economics 



MARTHA P. BAILEY 



For information on this subject see Randall. I 
Marie. 



East Montpelier, Vt. 
Library Science 



GERTRL'DE F. BAKER 

To some people she seems quiet, but they just 
ought to see her playing baseball or walking half 
a dozen times around Jamaica Pond. 

338 Highland Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

Basketball, Track, Baseball. Executive Committee (3 and 4 

General Science 



MARJORY I. BARTO 

Few girls could take such an active part in both 
college work and student activities and make such 
a success of both as Marjory. 

132 Chestnut Avenue. Waterbury, Conn. 

Executive Committee (2), Student Conduct Committee 
(3). Secretary of Student Government (3), Cabinet of 
Y.W.C.A. (3). Glee Club, Choir, Microcosm Board (4) 

Household Economics 





AVA S. BASSETT . 

Here's to our senior President : May her mind 
always be as quiet as her manner, and her own life 
as happy as she makes ours! 

171 Tremont Street, Taunton, Mass. 

Class Vice-President (3), Class President (4), Guild Sec- 
retary (3), Basketball, Track, Baseball, Manager of 
Track Team (2), Manager Basketball Team (3) 

Secretarial Studies 



INEZ E. BASSETT 

There are just two things that you can say about 
Inez — she always says what she means, and she 
always knows what she wants. 

171 Tremont Street, Taunton, Mass. 

Executive Committee (3), Endowment Fund Committee, 
Microcosm Board (4), Track, Baseball, Basketball, Man- 
ager Basketball Team (2) 

Secretarial Studies 



CLARA BEETLE 

Clara really can talk, although her motto is, 
"Silence is golden." 

E. French Avenue, New Bedford, Mass. 
Library Science 



LUCY S. BELL 
Always rings true. 



Beverly, Mass. 
Library Science 



HELENE A. BOEHMKE 

Heard in North Hall at 7.30, 12.45 and 6.0 
— Ding-a-ling-a-ling : 

Helene — Oh, Elorence, will you save me a seat 

2076 Cornell Road, Cleveland, Ohio 

President of Ohio Club, Chairman of Senior Ad 

Committee 
Household Economics 



FLORENCE A. BRAY 

At Home 

332 North Hall 

Toast and Tea 

Any Day Any Hour 

178 Pine Street, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Glee Club, Choir, Mandolin Club 
Household Economics 





EDITH BROWN 
Brown in name, but true blue in nature. 



Grafton, Mass. 
brary Science 



LYDIA G. BROWN 

Who is this? Why, Lydia Brown! 
You should know by the giggle that runs up and 
down. 

184 Rockland Street, New Bedford, Mass. 
Basketball, Track 
Secretarial Studies 



HELEN F. CARLETON 

At first she's just a quiet and a cunning little girl. 
And next you find she knows a thing or two, 
And after that you find she's one of all. the 

staunchest friends 
Your College course has ever offered you. 

137 Peterborough Street, Boston, Mass. 
Chairman of Senior Luncheon Committee 
Library Science 



46 



JENNETTE R. CARPENTER 

Jennette already shows the result of her train- 
ing in sewing and design by her ability to blend 
bright colors in a pleasant way. 

125 Marion Avenue, Mansfield, Ohio 
Household Economics 



ANITA Q. CLARK 

Everybody loves 'Nita — why say more? 

221 Westland Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Class Secretary (2 and 4), Mandolin Club, Chairman of 

Floor Committee, Junior Prom. 
Secretarial Studies 



OLIVE M. COLTON 

Every class needs at least one practical joker 
and Olive has several times demonstrated that sh* 
is capable of filling that position for 1914. 

Fairlee, Vt. 
Household Economics 





CORA A. CRAWFORD 

Cora may consider herself lucky to have secured 
her education in the Boston Public Schools, but 
we are not sure. 

i Cambridge Street, Allston, Mass. 
nisehold Economics 



JANE O. CROWELL 

We wonder if Jane does not rue the day when 
Dr. D-w-ng discovered her name on the roll-call. 

Medway, Mass. 

rlee Club, Choir, Executive Committee (i) 
Household Economics 



ANNA J. DAVIS 

If A. J. were asked to sing "My Hero," we are 
afraid that she would strike up "And when I talk, 
I always talk of Bill." 

2 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
nisehold Economics 



IDA M. DAVIS 

We suppose that one reason why Ida found she 
had to come back to Simmons was that she couldn't 
forego the theatres, etc. of Boston. 

520 Second St.. Marietta, Ohio 
Household Economics 



DOROTHY M. DAVOL 

That inevitable WHY. 

107 Sycamore St., Winter Hill, Mass. 
Choir, Track, Basketball 
Household Ec 



MILDRED E. DIMICK 

What have we done, Mildred, that you should 
spend more time visiting than anybody else in the 
dormitories? But such being the case, why not 
give the Endowment Fund Committee the privi- 
lege of sub-letting your room over week-ends ? 

57 Russell St., Watertown, Mass. 
Library Science 





MARY A. DOHERTY 
Whose mission in life is the welfare of man. 



Scituate, Mass. 
Household Economics 



AGNES T. DOYLE 

Now that she has taken off her hair-ribbon, 
Agnes looks almost old enough to be a Senior. 

22 Weld Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 
Secretarial Studies 



FRANCES M. DUNNING 

Xperiments and Xperience prove that she is an 
Xample of Xceptional Xcellence. 

156 Cedar St., Bangor, Me. 
President of Maine Club 
Household Economics 



CONSTANCE G. EKSTRAND 

Curious Freshman — Why do you eat so much 
butter? 

Con — Because it is shortening. 

Boonton, N. J. 

Class Vice-President (2), President of New Jersey Club, 
Chairman of Senior Faculty Party, Choir, Mandolin Club, 
Basketball, Track, Captain Basketball Team (1, 4) 

Secretarial Studies 



ELIZABETH P. ELA 

We think that possibly poking about among 
dusty books may have something to do with Eliza- 
beth's dry sense of humor. 

421 Green St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Library Science 




INEZ H. ESSICK 
"Listened, perhaps, but never talked at al 



1 168 Second St., Des Moines, low; 
Household Economics 



f 




HELEN M. FARNHAM 

If a girl goes to bed very early, 

She gets up the next day feeling surly; 

And then, oh alas! 

She is late to first class, 
And everything's all hurly-burly. 



>ver, N. H. 
Dusehold Economics 



SARAH M. FINDLEY 
"The Girl from Home" — Kokomo. 



W. Walnut St., Kokomo, Ind. 
ary Science 



GERTRUDE FORD 

Third floor South is very proud of its auto- 
mobile — a little Ford runabout. 

273 Tremont St., Newton, Mass. 

Manager of Showcase (2 and 3), Microcosm Board (3 and 

4), Glee Club, Choir, Mandolin Club 
Secretarial Studies 



FLORENCE B. GALLANT 

Mrs. W-lm-n — Give several reasons, Mis; 
Gallant, why it would be well to have a voca- 
tional speller. 

For once the calm determined answer was 
not forthcoming. 

Exeter, N. H. 

Student Conduct Committee (2), Class Treasurer (3), 

President of New Hampshire Club. 
Household Economics 



AGNES C. GARTLAND 

Agnes does not know the meaning of failure- 
and she is just as successful a friend as she i« 
student. 

9 Merlin St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Student Conduct Committee (3), Executive Committee (4 

Chairman of Invitation and Program Committee (4) 
Secretarial Studies 



ETTA M. GASPEY 

"Men may come, and men may go, 
But I go on forever." 



42 First Street, Melrose, Mass. 
Secretarial Studies 





FAYE B. GRANTHAM 

We have often heard people speak most highly 
of that little book called "Cooking for Two." 
It might be a good one to try, Faye. 

Wilmington, Ohio 
Household Economics 



HAZEL HALE 

Hale, fellow, well met! 

Portland, Conn. 

Executive Committee (2), Student Government Coun- 
cil (3). Basketball 
General Science 



MABEL L. HANSON 
'Too much complaining maketh the heart sad. 



Rockingham, N. H. 
Household Economics 



LOUISA H. HARDY 

8.53 a.m. — Has anyone seen my fountain pen? 
Where is my fountain pen? I want my fountain 
pen. Who's got it? 

Hollis, N. H. 

Glee Club, Choir, President of Musical Association (4) 

Household Economics 



AGNES V. HATCH 

"Enter without knocking; remain under the same 
condition." 

51 Grove Hill Ave., Newtonville, Mass. 
Executive Committee (4) 
Household Economics 



FRANCES S. HUGHITT 

The hardest worker, the jolliest player and the 
truest friend. 

83 Seymour St., Auburn, N. Y. 

Executive Committee (1 and 2), Chairman of Soiree Com- 
mittee, Chairman of Endowment Fund Committee (4), 
President of New York Club (4) 

Secretarial Studies 





KATHARINE M. HUNTINGTON 

The Four Hundred: New York:: The Big Four: 
Simmons 

Edgehill Inn, Spuyten Duyvil, N. Y. 
Tennis, Baseball 
Household Economics 



GLADYS A. KIMBALL 

Gladys has rebelled against a narrow secretarial 
life, and has decided to follow the BROAD and 
liberal-minded pursuit of accountancy. 

22 Humphrey St., Lowell, Mass. 

Student Government Council (4), Endowment Fund 

Committee (4), Manager of Dormitory Store (4) 
Secretarial Studies 



RUTH B. KLEIN 

We have faith to believe that the one infallible 
method of attaining a goal is to interrogate at 
every point at which a question arises. (Brass- 
button-officials preferred.) 

Natick, Mass. 

Chairman of Invitation Committee Junior Prom., Class 

Treasurer (4), Track 
Secretarial Studies 



MARGARET M. KNEIL 



'I love to be merry and wise, 

To laugh and cajole with a friend." 



230 Nelson St., Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Mandolin Club 
Library Science 



LILLIAN M. LAWRENCE 

Any of us might be proud of a record like Li 
lian's, since she has missed almost no classes durin 
the entire four years. 

Wakefield, Mass. 
Household Economics 



AMY L. LEONARD 

Amy's even disposition is certainly worthy of her 
level head. 

Stoughton, Mass. 
Secretarial Studies 





SARAH H. LeV ALLEY 

When Sally combines her humor with her 
'horse-serse" — well, anyway, that's Sally. 



udent Conduct Committee (2), Treasurer of Y. W. C. 
A. (3), Tennis 
ousehold Economics 



NORMA L. LIBBY 

"My clothes can not be duplicated in Boston." 

Gorham Ave., Brookline, Mass. 
.•e Club, Tennis 
nisehold Economics 



mary a. McCarthy 

When you see "Mar' Alice," look for Kather- 
ine — she must be somewhere near. 

59 Kenoya Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 

Track 

Library Science 



HELEN G. MACKAY 

Helen, advocate of speed, has taken up stenotypj 

124 Franklin St., Fall River, Mass. 
Tennis, Track 
Secretarial Studies 



VERA McNAIR 

A good many of us do plenty of talking (of 3 
sort) in class but if only we could all speak as 
much to the point as Vera ! 

314 College Ave., Floughton, Mich. 
Household Economics 



MARY McRORY 

Oh, Mary Mac, with the care-bowed back, 
How does your Mic work go? 
With bills and ads and contract pads 
And photographs all in a row ! 

Port Henry, N. Y. 
Microcosm Board (4) 
Secretarial Studies 




t 




es 



ELSIE C. MILLS 

Elsie has grown to be quite a secretarial shark. 
We congratulate you, Elsie, for we know how hard 
it is to keep up College work when our evenings 
are all otherwise engaged. 

29 Bacon St., Worcester, Mass. 

Chairman of Lunchroom Committee (4), Chairman of 

Cap and Gown Committee 
Secretarial Studies 



ANNA M. MOORE 

Favorite State — New Hampshire. 
Favorite Town — Hanover. 
Favorite College 

133 Peterborough St., Boston, Mass. 
Household Economics 



EVELYN C. MORGAN 

"For she is just the quiet kind whose natures 
never vary." 

12 Sunnyside Ave., Winter Hill, Mass. 
Household Economics 



60 



PAULA F. MUELLER 

President of the Tactful (?) Club. 

130 Noble Rd., E. Cleveland, Ohio 

Chairman of Accommodations Committee Junior Prom., 

Chairman of Class Day Committee 
Household Economics 



ELSIE R. MURPHY 

The first of the Seven Sutherland Sisters. 

IQ4 1 -' Main St., Gloucester, Mass. 

Track 

Secretarial Studies 



ALICE J. NEALE 

Alice didn't come to us until junior year, but 
we feel mighty lucky that she chose us then. One 
more good friend. 

Allandale Hill, E. Cleveland. Ohio 
Secretarial Studies 





EDITH S. NEWCOMET 



As four instructors out of five tell her, "We are 
hvays glad to see Newcomers." 



916 Cherekee Rd., Louisville, Ky. 
Library Science 



LILLIAN F. NISBET 

One of the girls said the other day that the 
reason she liked Lillian was because she was uterly 
sinsere, down-write honest and etternally the same. 

Rehoboth, Mass. 

Class Secretary (3), President of S. A. A. (4), Student 

Conduct Committee (4), Basketball, Track, Baseball, 

Captain of Basketball Team (3) 
Library Science 



MARION Y. OSTRANDER 

Dear Mrs. Simmons: 

You have helped many girls in trouble, I know, 
and I am going to ask you if you will give me 
some advice. Everybody is so fond of my room- 
mate, and, for the past two years, she has been 
so busy seeing that college is properly run, that I 
almost never see her myself. I wonder if you 
would tell me how I could win her back to our 
once-happy home. 

Hopefully yours, 

Babo's Lonesome Roommate. 

Schuylerville, N. Y. 

Treasurer of Student Guild (3), Chairman of Student 
Guild (4), Class President (3), Secretary of S. A. A., 
(2), Vice-President of Student Government (4), Student 
Conduct Committee (4), Microcosm Board (4). Choir, 
Basketball, Track 

Secretarial Studies 



02 



MARGARET E. PAGE 

Always correct in her transcripts — 
Always the first to get done — 
Accounts work is just a mere trifle- 
Finds Economics quite fun. 



Franklin, Mass. 
Secretarial Studies 



MILDRED W. PAGE 




If there were only such things as oral 


speed 


tests, we are sure that Mildred would get 


a gold 


medal. 




Haverhill, Mass. 




Library Science 





RUTH H. PARKER 

Ruth is firm in all debate, 
Dare we say she is obstinate ? 

Ask the Ouija Board. 



Northfield, Vt. 
Library Science 





MARJORIE PARMLEY 

"For every season she hath dressing fit. 
For winter, spring and summer." 

217 Innwood Avenue, Upper Montclair, N.J. 

Chairman of Sophomore Luncheon Committee, Chairman 

of Program Committee Junior Prom. 
Household Economics 



L. MARGARET PERLEY 

Her greatest interest is to be found on the 
sporting page between April and October. 

Cambridge, Vt. 

President of Vermont Club 

Household Ec 



EDNA E. PERRY 

'This quiet child is Edna Perry — 
Seldom cheerful, never merry — 
She is very sad, oh very!! 

5 Park Vale, Brookline, Mass. 

Chairman Refreshment Committee Junior Prom. 

Household Economics 



64 



JOSEPHINE C. PERRY 

"Deeming nothing to be done if anything re 
mained to do." 

619 Taylor Street, Topeka, Kans. 

Student Government Council (4), Executive Committs 

(3) 
Household Economics 



HELEN I. PETERSEN 

What is the difference between Helen and 
Rest Room? 
Helen is quiet. 

Concord, Mass. 
Secretarial Studies 



EMMA F. POORE 

"She should never have looked at me if she 
meant I should not love her." 

55 Common Street, Watertown, Mass. 
Mandolin Club, Baseball 
Household Economics 





MARGUERITE POORE 



In Economics class at 9.05 — "Come right in and 
sit down, Miss Poore." 



55 Common Street, Watertown, Mass. 
Household Economics 



MARGARET A. POTTER 

Tune — Little Brown Jug 

There's a girl in the Senior class 
Who is quite a jolly lass. 
She can always cause some fun — 
Crack a joke or make a pun. 

Sharon, Mass. 

Executive Committee (3), Class Vice-President (4), Track 

Library Science 



IONA M. RANDALL 

Unlike "time and tide" — see Bartlett's "Quota- 
tions." 

180 Spring Street, Brockton, Mass. 
Glee Club, Choir 
Library Science 



CHARLOTTE E. REID 

We wonder if Charlotte didn't make a mistake 
Didn't she mean to take the one year course? 

60 Woodbine Street, Auburndale, Mass. 
Glee Club, Choir, Secretary-Treasurer of Musical Asso- 
ciation (3 and 4) 
Household Economics 



EDITH F. RICHARDSON 

Dormitory life was too much for Edith wh 
preferred the simple ( ?) life of a commuter. 

Millis, Mass. 
Glee Club, Choir 
Secretarial Studies 



RUTH A. ROUND Y 

There is a girl who lives in East — 
To know her is a pleasure — 
She's a rosy cheek and laughing eye 
And smiles in goodly measure. 

136 Paine Street, Worcester, Mass. 
Glee Club, Choir 
Household Economics 




fk 



f* 




MARGARET RUDD 

Margaret gave the University of Chicago a fair 
try-out and then came to Simmons. Thank you, 
Margaret. 

Blue Island, 111. 
Secretarial Studies 



DOROTHY RUSSELL 

When suffrage for women wins out, we foresee 
a great future for Dorothy on account of her 
ability to set forth all matters clearly and at 
length. 

Plymouth, Mass. 
Glee Club, Choir 
Household Economics 



REBECCA S. SACKETT 

The Dansant 

Oct. 5, 1915 3:30 — 5:30 p.m. 

Miss Rebecca Sackett 

Premiere Danseuse 

!7 Arlington Avenue, Providence, R. I. 
Fennis, Baseball 

i lousehold Economics 



HARRIET E. SALISBURY 

"I love tranquil solitude 
And such society 
As is quiet, wise and good." 

Schuylerville, N. Y. 

Secretary-Treasurer of Glee Club (3), Manager of Glee 

Club (4), Vice-President of Y.W.C.A. (3), President of 

Y.W.C.A. (4), Choir 
Household Economics 



CLARA S. SARGENT 

Sufficient unto herself. 

29 Lindsey Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
President of Socialist Club 
General Science 



MARION L. SMALL 

We wonder how Marion is getting along 
the new cut system. "Ah, what a change!" 



Saugus 
I.ibnin 



Mass. 
Science 




69 




HELEN P. SMITH 



Whatever else may be said about Helen, she 
blest with an immortal name. 



Somerville, Mass. 
)rary Science 



MARGERY M. SMITH 
It is a woman's privilege to speak her mind. 



Skowhegan, Me. 
Household Economics 



MARJORIE G. SMITH 

We sincerely hope, Marjorie, that after you have 
left college you won't have as hard a time as you 
did before in keeping yourself sorted out from 
other people. 

Wakefield, Mass. 
Household Economics 



MARGARET A. SUTHERLAND 

Any girl in the class who has difficulty in fin- 
ishing her work so as to get to bed by 10 or 10.30 
should confer with Margaret, who, it is reported, 
has perfected a very excellent system. 

27 Elm Street, Brookline, Mass. 
Student Conduct Committee (4) 
Household Economics 



AGNES L. TAISEY 

Agnes is the sort of a girl who does so many 
little kindnesses in her unobtrusive way that those 
who know her are bound to love her. 

12 Warwick Street, Lowell, Mass. 
Glee Club, Choir 
Secretarial Studies 



CONSTANCE TRAIN 

You hear a laugh ? That's Constance Train, 
And though she has a mighty brain 
Yet fun at others she will poke, 
And all the world's to her a joke. 

Wellfleet, Mass. 
Glee Club, Choir 
Secretarial Studies 





DOROTHY TYACKE 

Dorothy, mad in the pursuit of culture, is, 
through self-indulgence, exposing herself to that 
dread disease called Lecturitis. 

Maiden, Mass. 
Basketball, Track 
Secretarial Studies 



KATHERTNE WARREN 




"Will you please speak a little louder, 


Miss 


Warren? I don't think that the people 


n the 


front row can hear you." 




Grafton, Mass. 




Mandolin Club 




Library Science 





RUTH K. WHITING 

Other colleges say that Simmons has no system 
of training for her Student Government officers. 
We have a feeling that Ruth has been trained by 
taking care of us all ever since she arrived in Bos- 
ton four years ago. Possibly this is not really 
training, but merely evidence of her ability. 

Great Barrington, Mass. 

Executive Committee (i), Student Conduct Committee 
(i), Class President (2), Chairman of Welcoming Com- 
mittee (3), YW.C.A. Cabinet (3), Chairman of Decora- 
tion Committee Junior Prom., President of Student Gov- 
ernment (4), Vice-Chairman of Student Guild (4), 
Microcosm Board (4), Baseball, Choir 

Household Economics 



SARAH F. WHITNEY 

The girl to whom we owe a vote of thanks 
for the success of this book. 

Natick, Mass. 
Microcosm Board (4) 
Secretarial Studies 




f 




NANCY PEIRCE 

July 19, 1913 

Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Peirce (Marian W. Greene) 

1914 CLASS BABY 



OIlaBB of 1015 




Marjorie T. Underwood 
Vice-President 



©ffirera 

Alice C. Livingston 
President 



Ellen S. Daniels 
Treasurer 



Rhea M. Gillespie 

Secretary 



Executive Board 
Marion F. Cross Caroline D. Sparrow 

Gladys E. Minott Martha D. Ring 




OUaas af 1015 

Name Home 

ABBOTT, GLADYS C Bridgton, Me. 

ALDRICH, HELEN C . Boston 

ALEXANDER, ADA E Los Gatos, Cal. 

ALLEN, ANITA M Manchester, N. H. 

ALLEY, FRANCES N Cortland, N. Y. 

AMES, HARRIET C N. Attleboro 

ANDERSON, EDITH V Boston 

ANDREWS, HELEN B Hudson 

BABSON, ALICE E Gloucester 

BAKER, DOROTHY N Newport, R. I. 

BATCHELLER, MARGARET E. . . . • Olean, N. Y. 

BATEMAN, RUBY W Boston 

BEECHER, LENA C Cortland, N. Y. 

BENT,' MILDRED M Lynn 

BIGELOW, GLADYS M St. Albans, Me. 

BOARDMAN, MIRIAM H Marblehead 

BORGESON, SIGNELD K Oakland, Cal. 

BRANN, MARGARET E Bangor, Me. 

BROWN, MILDRED B Groton 

CARTLAND, MARIAN P . Saco, Me. 

CHAFFIN, ISABELLE L. ..." Worcester 

CLARK, ELINOR Schenectady, N. Y. 

CLARK, MARGARET M Haverhill 

CLARKE, DOROTHY M Holden 

CLEMENCE, GERTRUDE B Soulhbridge 

COOK, EVELINE B Boston 

CRAWFORD, HELEN Cambridge 

CRAWLEY, M. GENEVIEVE Gloucester 

CROSS, MARIAN F Fitchburg 

DANIELS, ELLEN S Fitchburg 

DAVIS, MILDRED A ■ . Alton Bav, N. H. 

DAY, THERESA M. . . ' Boston 

DELANO, LOUISE J Boston 

DIMICK, MILDRED E Watertown 

DIXON, GLADYS L Cambridge 

DODGE, CAROLYN F Cambridge 

DORING, LAURA L Cambridge 

EASTON, CANDACE Monroeville, O. 

EATON, RUTH M Boston 

ELLIS, MYRTLE V Cambridge 

FENNELL, ANNIE R. C. . Boston 

FOWLER, ETHEL K Maiden 

FREEMAN, ELIZABETH K. F Central Fails, R. 1. 

FRIZELL, DOROTHY R Boston 

GERALD, HELEN T Canton 

GIBLIN, ESTHER A. . Utica, N. Y. 

80 



Name 
GILE, HELEN 
GILLESPIE, RHEA M. 
GORDON, G. GLADYS 
GORDON, KATHRYN T. 
GORE, DOROTHY, R. 
GRANT, PEARL A. . 
GREEF, ELVA . , 
GREENE, GLADYS M. 
GREENE. LYDIAN H. 
HALE, HAZEL 
HAPGOOD, RUTH M. 
HATCH, RUTH W. . 
HAYWARD, ELEANOR 
HIGHT, ELSIE D. 
HINDS, HELEN . . 
HINE, MARION E. . 
HITCHCOCK, CELIA . 
HOBART, KATHERINE 
HODGES, GRACE A. . 
HOGAN, MARGARET L. 
H OLDEN, KATHERINE ] 
HOLMES, MARGARET F. 
HOOKER, FRIEDA C. 
HUBBARD, ANNA . 
HYLAND, WINONA C. 
JACQUES, OLIVE M. . 
JENKINS, FLORENCE L. 
JENKINS, MAUDE E. 
JOHNSON, LEANNA F 
JOHNSTON, EDITH . 
JOST, BESSIE L. . . 
KANE, CHRISTINE J. 
KEEGAN, ELLEN S. . 
KEIBER, HELENA K. 
KENNEDY, MARION E. 
KENNISON, ELIZABETH 
KLOSS, ANNA A. . 
LARKIN, ELSEY W, . 
LAWRENCE, C. WINIFRED 
LEFFINGWELL, IRMA M. 
LEONARD, MARION F. 
Le VALLEY, SARAH H. 
LIBBY, MILDRED A. . 
LINLEY, HELEN F. . 
LIVINGSTON, ALICE C. 
LOGAN, LILLIAN A. . 
LOUGH, ALICE M. . 
LUDGATE, JESSIE H. 



Home 

. . . . Melrose 

N. Tonawanda, N. Y. 

W. Newbury 

. Milton 

. Newton 

Boston 

Eldora, la. 

. Milton 

Greenfield 

Portland, Ct. 

Hartford, Ct. 

. Maiden 

Walpole, N. H. 

Sharon 

Stoneham 

d Rapids, Mich. 

Conesus, N. V. 

Cleveland, O. 

Foxboro 

W. Newbury 

Portland. Me. 

Plymouth 

Barre, Vt. 

Boston 

Springfield 

Haverhill 

. Reading 

. Newton 

. Norfolk 

Boston 

Boston 

. . Spencer 

Cambridge 

Clinton. Ct. 

Dover, N. H. 

Boston 

W. Boylston 

Le Roy, N. V. 

nghamton. N. Y. 

Burlington. Vt. 

Abington 

. Hope, R. I. 

Concord, N. H. 

. Spencer 

Manchester, N. H. 

Leicester 

Fargo, X. D. 

Beaver. Pa. 



Name Home 

McCORMICK, GERTRUDE M Boston 

McDONALD, THERESA A Brookline 

McDOUGALL, HELEN Plattsburg, N. Y. 

McDOWELL, ELLA R Needham 

MARDEN, KATHERINE Boston 

MASON, NINA A Pawlet, Vt. 

MINOTT, GLADYS E. Gardner 

MIRICK, LYDIA L Worcester 

MITCHELL, ALICE H Weedsport, N. Y. 

MURPHY, JANET S Boston 

MYERS, LOIS N Boonton, N. J. 

NICKERSON, BERTHA Somerville 

OBER HELEN P Ashland, N. H. 

O'BRIEN, HELENA V Framingham 

ORVIS, SARAH W Manchester, Vt. 

PATTILLO, EMMA M Truro, N. S. 

PEIRCE, RUTH B Somerville 

PERRY, ELINOR Natick 

PIERCE, LILLIAN M Holbrook 

PIKE, LUCILE P Medford 

PINKHAM, MARY A Fort Kent, Me. 

PINNOCK, LORNA Salem 

PLATTS, RUTH A Holbrook 

POTWINE, MARJORIE A E. Windsor, Ct. 

PRATT, MARY G Boston 

PUTNAM, HARRIET Chicago, 111. 

RANDALL, ELEANOR T Hampstead, N. H. 

RAY, ALICE M Boston 

REID, F. MARION Boston 

RING, MARTHA D Quincy 

ROONEY, KATHARINE E Boston 

RUBY, OLIVE C Oneida, N. Y. 

SCHWARTZ, MARGUERITE R Newton 

SEARS, MILDRED G - Brookline 

SHAW, GERTRUDE A Quincy 

SHAW, LENA F Boston 

SHAW, MARJORIE Belfast, Me. 

SHEEHAN, JANE Maiden 

SIMS, MARGARET New Haven, Ct. 

SISSON, CLARA M Cumberland Mills, Me. 

SMALLEY, MARIE F Dennis 

SNYDER, MARGARET T Newton 

SPARROW, CAROLINE D Boston 

SPRAGUE, CAROLINE E Quincy 

SPRAGUE, MARGARET M Turner, Me. 

STONE, RUTH P Somerville 

SWIFT, A. HAZEL Milton 

TAFT, MARTHA E Gloucester 

82 



Name Home 

TAYLOR, JANETTE M Maynard 

THOMAS, JULIA E Gloucester 

THOMAS, KATHARINE J Alstead Center, N. H. 

TOMPSON, LAURA F Salisbury, N. Y. 

THORNLEY, MARGARET Marietta. O. 

THROSSELL, DOROTHY Cleveland, O. 

TINGLEY, LOUISE C Boston 

TITCOMB, MARION . . . . Northampton 

THOMPSON, GERTRUDE E Portland, Me. 

TOROSS1AN, CHRISTINA Chelsea 

TURNER, A. REBECCA Reading 

TURNER, M. LILLIAN Wellesley 

UNDERWOOD. MARJORIE T Boston 

UPHAM, ANNE T. . . .■ Keene, N. 11. 

VORIES, RUTH E Pueblo, Colo. 

WALKER, KATHERINE A Beverly 

WALWORTH, LILLIAN Lawrence 

WARD, MARY W Topeka, Kan. 

WAVLE, HAZEL H Cambridge 

WAVLE, LILLIAN A Cortland. N. Y. 

WHITCOMB, LOUISE R Holbrook 

WHITE, MARIE Cookeville, Tenn. 

WHITE, RUTH Knoxville, Tenn. 

WILDE, GLADYS F Littleton 

WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH M W. Concord. N. H. 

WILLIAMS, HILDA C Milford 

YAGER, PAULINE M ' Watertown, N. Y. 



)4 >\ 




QUaafi of IHlfi 




©fftcprs 







Fra 


VCES B. 


Banks 
















President 










Marjorie Soper 












Martha A. 


Whiting 


Vice-President 














Secretary 






Katharine M 


. Leonard 














Treasu 


■er 














Executive 


Board 










Esther F. 


Tucker 






Ruth F 


. Howe 




Gertrude 


F. 


Hussey 






Eva 


A. 


Jacobi 






Name Home 

ADAMS, MARION G Rockland 

ALLISON, J. OLIVE Boston 

ANDREWS, MARION L Norwalk, O. 

AUSTIN, DOROTHY L Wellesley 

BANKS, FRANCES B Barrington Passage, N. S. 

BARNICOAT, OLIVE Quincy 

BASTON, LINA F Sanford, Me, 

BELL, DOROTHY G Boston 

BERRY, IRMA L Maiden 

BOUVE, G. ELIZABETH Brookline 

BOUVE, MILDRED Newton 

BRAGDON, EDNA W York Village, Me. 

BRETT, I. OLIVE Greenville, Me. 

BREWSTER, EVELYN Wolfboro, N. H. 

BROWN, ESTELLA I Collinsville, Ct. 

BURNES, MARGUERITE C Chelsea 

BURNS, MARGARET Arlington 

CARLING, WINIFRED Oxford 

CARY, HELEN H ■ Lowell 

CHANDLER, ADELE Plymouth 

CHAPIN, DOROTHY A Somerville 

CLARK, BERTHA E Portland, Me. 

CLEVELAND, MADELINE Houlton, Me. 

COATS, ELLA M Cooperstown, N. Y. 

COKER, E. MARGUERITE Somerville 

COLONNA, EILEEN A Washington, D. C. 

CONGDON, NETTIE Nantucket 

CORNISH, HAZEL M Bowdoinham, Me. 

CORWIN, RUTH B Newark, N. J. 

COSGROVE, HELEN Worcester 

CRAGIN, JEAN Farmington, Me. 

CUMMINGS, RUTH . Providence, R. I. 

CUNNINGHAM, MARY H Cambridge 

CURRIER, MARGARET S. . . . ■ E. Kingston, N. H. 

CURTIS, GERTRUDE W Cambridge 

DEMING, KATHERINE Bellows Falls, Vt. 

DOANE, HELEN S Brewster 

DONOVAN, IRENE E Boston 

DOUGLAS, KATHERINE Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

DRAKE, EDNA F Sharon 

DRINKER, RACHEL R Pittsburg, Pa. 

DWYER, FRANCES T Boston 

EASTMAN, NETTIE V So. Weare, N. H. 

EMERSON, GLADYS M Andover, N. H. 

ENSLIN, ESTHER Ashland 

FAGG, HELEN M. Minneapolis, Minn. 

87 



Name Home 

FAIRCHILD, LOUISE M ...-.-. Durham, N. H. 

FELDENTHAL, LEONTINE Boston 

FIELD, MARY E Leverett 

FISH, MARION G Somerville 

FISHER, AGNES A Quincy 

FISHER, J. OPAL Buffalo, N. Y. 

FISHER, LUCILE C Boonton, N. J. 

FLAVELL, MARION L Marshfield 

FOOTE, LEONE M Mt. Morris, N. Y. 

FOSTER, ELLEN Central Falls, R. I. 

FOSTER, HELEN B Swampscott 

FOSTER, HELEN M Hingham 

FOWLER, ELIZABETH Concord, N. H. 

FREEMAN, ESTELLE L Harvard 

GIERE, HELEN P Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

GILMAN, DOROTHY Tilton, N. H. 

GOODWIN, CELIA W Pittsfield 

GRANT, MADELEINE P Boston 

GRAY, ALICE T Revere 

GRAY, RENA Arlington 

HALEY, ALICE H Beaver, Pa. 

HALL, FRANCES E Canandaigua, N. Y. 

HAMMOND, RUTH ' Newton 

HARTFORD, MABEL E. Duxbury 

HAWKES, ESTHER J. . Boston 

HAWLEY, ESTELLE E Pittsford, N. Y. 

HAYE. LOLA L Westwood 

HAYES. RUBY P Hamilton 

HAYWARD. MARION W Easton 

HEIMER, MARGARET G Unadilla, N. Y. 

HESELTINE, MARJORIE M Portland, Me. 

HILL, LUCILE W Hartford, Ct. 

HILLS. MARION Natick 

HILLS, RUTH E Hollis, N. H. 

HOITT, MABEL V Lynn 

HOLLAND, MABEL H Easton 

HOWE, RUTH F. Cambridge 

HOWLETT, ELSIE M '.'... Cambridge 

HUBBARD, FLORENCE P Concord 

HUDNUT, RUTH A New Bedford 

HULSIZER, E. MARJORIE Flemington, N. J. 

HUMPHREY, ELLEN H Rochester 

HURLBUTT, ISABELLE B New York, N. Y. 

HURLEY, MILDRED Worcester 

HUSSEY, GERTRUDE F . Albany, N. Y. 

HUSTED, HELEN G Lynnfield 

HUTCH INS. MILDRED G Randolph Vt 

INGLIS, DOROTHY B Grosse He, Mich. 



Name Home 

JACOBI. EVA A Boston 

JACOBS, ELIZABETH P Utica, N. Y. 

JACOBSON, DORA Chelsea 

JOUVETTE, MAE A. E New Bedford 

KEEGAN, FRANCES E W. Newbury 

KEIRSTEAD, KATHLEEN S Lynn 

KELLY, MARY C ... Portsmouth, N. H. 

KNOWLES, BEULAH A Jamestown, R. I. 

LEAMY, JULIA A Fair Haven, Vt. 

LEONARD, KATHARINE M Buffalo, N. Y. 

LITTLEFIELD, HAZEL O Portland, Me. 

LOCKHART, MARGARET Almond, N. Y. 

LOFSTEDT, S. CHRISTINA Boston 

LUCAS, MABEL E Boston 

LUDDY, ANNA Boston 

LUTH.IN, FRANCES E. J Boston 

MCCARTHY, ALICE L . • Easton 

McGRATH, MARGARET E Fitchburg 

MAHAR, ELSIE A Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

MANNING, KATHARINE A Newton 

MARTIN, HELEN E Rutland, Vt. 

MASSON, JEAN E Lowell 

MERRIAM, EMILY D Framingham 

MIDDLETON, KATHARINE J Boston 

MILLER, GERTRUDE M Chelsea 

MITCHELL, EDNA M Dayton, 0. 

MOWER, HARRIET S Boston 

MUNGER, CLARA L Catskill, N. Y. 

NAGLE, ANNA R Acton 

NIMMS, MARY A Albany, N. Y. 

O'BRIEN, MARY A. Chicago, 111. 

O'KANE, K. EILENE Newton 

ORDWAY, MARION L Winthrop 

PERRY, MARION R Weston 

PHELAN, RACHEL R Medford 

PHILBRICK, BLANCHE C Epsom, N. H. 

PHILLIPS, GRACE P Carthage, N. Y. 

POND, EDNA L Spencer 

POTTLE, HELEN B Farmington, Me. 

RANDALL. HELEN Wakefield 

REARDON, ROSE D Worcester 

REYNOLDS, ELLA I Canton 

RHODES, EDNAH G Quincy 

RICHARDSON, AMY Castine, Me. 

RICHARDSON, ESTHER Brookhne 

RIGHTER, CAROLINE Port Jervis, N. Y. 

RILEY, MARY L Cambridge 

ROBINSON, HARRIET E. Ipswich 

RODGERS, FRANCES V. V Manila, P. I. 

89 



Name Home 

RODLER, HILDA M Davenport, la. 

ROGERS, MARY E Hampton Institute, Va. 

ROSS, FLORENCE M Revere 

ROUNDS, ALICE M. Providence, R. I. 

RUTLEDGE, AGNES P. Billerica 

SAFFORD, EMILY Reading 

SAWYER, GEORGIA L Saugus 

SCHULTZ, A. LOUISE Latrobe, Pa. 

SHALZ, PAULINE A Boston 

SHAW, MARY L Rockland 

SHERMAN, ETHEL M Liberty, Me. 

SINCLAIR, MARGARET E. Boston 

SMITH, MILDRED C Waltham 

SOPER, MARJORIE Waterbury, Ct. 

STACKHOUSE, ELLEN R Boston 

STARK, MARION E ■ Manchester, N. H. 

STEARNS, EDITH L. Manchester, N. H. 

STEARNS, LUCY W Winchester 

STEVENS, MURIEL Boston 

STICKNEY, ESTHER L Maiden 

STONE, ALICE A Maiden 

SULLIVAN, MARGARET A Worcester 

TAVENDER, OTTILIA K Boston 

TIBBETTS, DOROTHY M Washington, D. C. 

TITUS, OLIVE M Newton 

TODD, ELIZABETH P Somerville 

TOLL, SARA R Scotia, N. Y. 

TOLMAN, MARGARET Portland, Me. 

TRIPLETT, GERTRUDE E Bangor, Me. 

TUCKER, ESTHER F Portland, Ore. 

TWITCHELL, MAY F Frammgham 

UPHAM, HELEN N Duluth, Minn. 

WARDWELL, LORNA A Stamford, N. Y. 

WARING, M. ELMERE Brookhne 

WEBB, EMILY G Rockland, Me. 

WEBBER, LILLIAN Newton 

WELCH, MARGARET M Wellesley 

WETMORE, MARION C Boston 

WHEELER, ALICE M Waltham 

WHEELER, MARION D Sharon 

WHITE, SARA A Unadilla, N. Y. 

WHITING, DOROTHY Winsted, Ct. 

WHITING, MARTHA A Franklin 

WILKINSON, MARION A. D Boston 

WILSON, ELEANOR Cambridge 

WOOD, ELLA L Brookhne 

WOODBRIDGE, LYDIA M Duluth, Minn. 

WOODMAN, GLADYS E Westborough 

WOODWARD, BLANCHE Franklin 

WRIGHT, LENA Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

YATES, MARJORIE Bolse ' Ida - 

YOUNG, HELEN E Brockton 



90 



Miriam R. Breese 
Vice-President 



aUaaa of \B\7 




Elizabeth H. Burbank 

President 



Margaret L. Gladwin 
Secretary 



Ruth Colby 

Treasurer 



Executive Board 
Ruth A. Gray Helen W. Stockbridge 

Eleanor R. Gregory Ruth Updegraff 




(jUaaa of 1$17 

Name Home 

ABBE, MARY N Boston 

ABBOTT, BARBARA M N. Reading 

ACKERMAN, GRETCHEN Nashua, N. H. 

ALLEN, EDITH R Bangor, Me. 

ANSON, OLIVE E. . Worcester 

AYER, MARION P Biddeford, Me. 

BALDWIN, HANNAH B Schenevus, N. Y. 

BARKER, ELEANOR Portland, Me. 

BARROWS, OLIVE Hartford, Ct. 

BARTON, EDITH A New Milford, Ct. 

BATES, LILLIAN G Hanover 

BATHGATE, MARIAN Newark, N. J. 

BAUER, ADA A N. Adams 

BAUMLER, JANE I Clinton, N. Y. 

BEAL, CONSTANCE Boston 

BECKETT, LILLIAN M Portland, Me. 

BECKFORD, ESTHER E Quincy 

BECKLEY, MAY J ' New York, N. Y. 

BETTS, NATALIE D Scranton, Pa. 

BLACK, DOROTHY M Stamford, Ct. 

BLANCHARD, CHARLOTTE Barre 

BOND, MARGUERITE Adams 

BONZAGNI, ANNA B Boston 

BOORN, MARION C Brattleboro, Vt. 

BOWMAN, MARION Sharon 

BOYCE, HELEN R Stoneham 

BOYD, ANNE G Boston 

BRADLEY, FRANCES M Branford, Ct. 

BREESE, MIRIAM R Forty Fort, Pa. 

BROWN, BEATRICE O Danvers 

BURBANK, ELIZABETH H Plymouth 

BURNES, MARION Boston 

CARRUTHERS, RUTH A Portland, Me. 

CHAPLIN, MARIE E Pawtucket, R. I. 

CHASE, MARIETTA L Webster 

CHILDS, BLANCHE E. . . Waltham 

CHURCH, MARGARET G Rochester, N. Y. 

CHURCHILL, SALLY Berlin, N. H. 

CLANCEY, HELEN I Milford 

CLARK, LEAH W. Boylston 

CLARY. LOUISE V • Maiden 

COLBY, RUTH Montclair, N. J. 

CONGDON, ANNA M Newport, R. I. 

COTTRELL, ALMA Gloucester 

COVELL, PRISCILLA B Fitchburg 

COX, NATHALIE Wakefield 



94 



Name Home 

CRADDOCK, HELEN G Syracuse, N. Y. 

CRAIG, MARION T Portsmouth, N. H. 

CROSBY, HELEN A Kingston, N. Y. 

CROSS, MYRA A Colebrook, N. H. 

CURRIER, PHEBE Colebrook, N. H. 

DAVENPORT, ISABEL W Plymouth, Pa. 

DAVIS, CAROLYN R Everett 

DAVIS. DORRIS Contoocook. N. H. 

DAVIS, RUTH A Royalston 

DAVIS, RUTH E Franklin, N. H. 

DAY, GLADYS C Med ford 

DECELLE, HELEN M Somerville 

DITTMER, M. FRANCES Brookline 

DOLE, ETHEL Concord, N. H. 

DOMERY, MARIAN S Albany, N. Y. 

DONNELLY, GLADYS S Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DOTEN, MARION Somerville 

DRISCOLL, MARION A Brookline 

DUGAN, MAY L Rutland, Vt. 

DUNCAN, MARGARET L Clearwater, Fla. 

DUNMORE, N GERTRUDE Providence. R. I. 

EASTMAN, MARJORIE Belleville, N. Y. 

EDGERLY, BEATRICE J Farmington, N. H. 

EDWARDS, JULIA A Fonda, "N. Y. 

ELLIS, GERTRUDE J Ansonia, Ct. 

ELLIS, STELLA D Castleton, Vt. 

ENARSON, ANNA H Montclair, N. J. 

ENGLUND, FLORENCE L New Sweden Sta., Me. 

FARRELL, MAUDE C Watertown 

FEE, LILLIAN C Boston 

FERGUSON, RUTH H Houlton, Me. 

FLANDERS, FLORENCE H New Hampton, N. H. 

FLEMING, ELIZABETH J Norwood 

FLYNN, ANNIE M Saugus 

FOSTER. ESTHER Bayhead. N. J. 

FRANCIS, RUTH I Medford 

FRENCH. BARBARA F Winchester 

FRIZZELL, DORIS I Lynn 

FURBER. ROSE L Washington. D. C. 

FURBUSH, ABIGAIL A Boston 

GAGE, MARJORIE H N. Reading 

GATES. LUCY L Westborough 

GEER. GLADYS V Scotland, Ct. 

GEORGE, WINIFRED R Maiden 

GIBLIX. LOUISE A Boston 

GILLETTE, HELEN H Revere 

GILLIS. CLARICE E N. Haven, Me. 

GLADWIN, MARGARET L Westfield 



95 



Name Home 

GLOVER, ABBIE G Somerville 

GLOVER, KATHERINE Danvers 

GOVAN, BERTHA M Cambridge 

GRADY, HELEN G Medford 

GRADY, MARION E Medford 

GRAHAM, LILLIAN B Boston 

GRAY, RUTH A Washington, D. C. 

GREEN, M. AILEEN • ■ Schenectady, N. Y. 

GREGORY, ELEANOR R Newark, N. J. 

GREGORY, ESTHER R Newark, N. J. 

GRIFFIN, SYLVIA M Worcester 

HAGAN, VESTA S Boston 

HAGERTY, KATHERINE M Boston 

HALL, CLARA E Burlington, Vt. 

HALLER, PAULINE M Watertown, N. Y. 

HAMILTON, HELENE Boston 

HANEY, KATHLEEN M Boston 

HARLOW, HELEN L "'. . Leavenworth, Kan. 

HARVEY, FLORENCE T Hartford, Ct. 

HASS, ELVERA P Rehoboth 

HAWES, INA L Oxford 

HAWKINS, MIRIAM E Lancaster 

HAWLEY, ESTHER G Brookline 

HAYES, LORETTA M Bridgeport, Ct. 

HAYNES, EDNA F Methuen 

HILL, RUTH L Southbridge 

HILTON, MARY O Boston 

HITT, PAULINE S Margaretville, N. Y. 

HODGES, HELEN R Derby, Ct. 

HOLBROOK, JENNIE L Douglas 

HOLMES. DOROTHY F Rutland, Vt. 

HOPKINS, OLIVE Waltham 

HUFF, EMMELYN Y N. Edgecomb, Me. 

JOHNSON, LOUISE P Brookline 

JONES, ANNA N Northboro 

JONES, HELEN S Stamford, Ct. 

KARNAN, ROSE W Boston 

KEITH, ELEANORE F Newton 

KELLEHER, MAY F. Ware 

KERR, FLORENCE E Titusville, Pa. 

KIRBY, ANNA M Boston 

KNEELAND, HELEN B * Ridgebury, Ct. 

KUNTZ, DOROTHY Newton 

LANE, EDNA P Boston 

LAPHAM, PHYLLIS Boston 

LAWRENCE, FAY A Tilton, N. H. 

LIVINGSTON, DORRIS Abington 

LIVINGSTON, RHODA E Boston 

96 



Name Home 

LOWELL, ELEAXOR N Newburyport 

MCCARTHY. CECILIA A Haverhill 

MCCARTHY. MARGUERITE K Winthrop 

MACKENZIE. MABEL L Boston 

McLAUGHLIN, KATHERIXE A Boston 

McLEOD. MAUDE L Patten. Me. 

McLOUGHLIX. MARY M Worcester 

McMAXAMA. FRAXCES Waltham 

McMULLIX. JESSIE H Cambridge 

MACRAE. BLAXCHE A Providence. R. I. 

MACY. CORIXXE S Pembroke 

MARTIX, MARJORIE A Boston 

MASON, PEARL L Adam;, Yt. 

MELCHER. YELMA Barre, Yt. 

MERRILL, HAZEL T Lawrence 

MILLER, ELISABETH Warren. O. 

MILLIKEX. B. ROMAYXE Boston 

MOXTEITH. EYELYX Boston 

MOOERS. ELIZABETH McC Plattsburg. X. Y. 

MORTOX, MILDRED \ewton 

MOULTOX. GRACE E Braintree 

MUXRO. BERXICE E Boston 

MUNT, CATHERIXE F Xorthbridge 

MURPHY. LOUISE W Boston 

MURPHY. MARY J Xatick 



Boston 

Boston 

Bogota. X. J 

X. Tonawanda, X. Y 



XASH. LUCY H 

XELSOX. BLAXCHE A 

XICHOLS. LUCY J 

OELKERS. DOROTHY E 

O'MALLEY. LOUISE P . Gorham, X. H 

PACKARD, ERXESTIXE Watertown 

PARKER, ALICE Quincy 

PARKER. MARY F Cooksville, Md 

PARXELL. ARABELLE Manchester. X. H 

PARTRIDGE. ABBY E Bluehill. Me. 

PEIRCE. MARGARET Chelsea 

PERRY. DOROTHA K Manchester. X. H. 

PERRY. PHOSA W Salem 

PETERS. MARY S Andover 

POLLARD. MARY V Proctorsville, Yt. 

POLSEY. MADELEIXE P Boston 

POTTER. ELIZABETH T Sharon 

PRATT. HELEX M Salem 

READY. MILDRED M Boston 

REE YES, HILDA M Reading 

RICE. DOROTHEA X Boston 

RICHARDSOX, GLADYS E Woburn 

RICKER. CHRISTIXE I Cambridge 



Name Home 

RIEFKOHL, EMILY A. . . Swampscott 

ROBERTS, REENA Somerville 

ROBINSON, GERTRUDE H Walpole 

ROBINSON, GLADYS S . . . Hudson 

RUGGLES, HELEN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RUSSELL. SALLY O Lawrence 

SADOW, ETTA S Plymouth 

SALLS. MARY W Belmont 

SCHENCK, IRENE E. - ' . . . . Schenectady, N. Y. 

SCULLY, PAULINE A Manchester, N. H. 

SEGEL, MIRIAM Melrose 

SHELDON, GLADYS A Lee 

SHOHAN, ADELE R Boston 

SMITH, ALMA M Pittsfield 

SMITH. FAYETTA E Hartford, Ct. 

SMITH, VERA Somerville 

SPALLER, UNA M Painesville, O. 

SPOONER, MARGARETTA R Harrisburg, Pa. 

SPRAGUE, KATHARINE G Newton 

STEELE, GLADYS E Somerville 

STERN, SELMA Berlin, N. H. 

STEVENS, ALICE M Boston 

STOCKBRIDGE, HELEN W Watertown 

STOVER. CLARA L Newburyport 

STUPP, EDNA M. K St. Louis, Mo. 

SUTPHEN, MADELINE Bernardsville, N. J. 

TABOR. MARION E Haverhill 

THOMPSON, MABEL H Newton 

THOMPSON, MILDRED Mariaville, N. Y. 

TOLAND, WILLAMAY Bethel, Vt. 

TOLMAN, HELEN I Hanover 

TRICKEY, DORIS M Northwood Narrows, N. H. 

TURNER. H. DOROTHY Reading 

UPDEGRAFF, RUTH Washington, D. C. 

VAN ORDEN. DOROTHY Pompton Lakes, N. J. 

VAN WINKLE, WILHELMINA Rutherford, N. J. 

WALKER. MARGARET Beverly 

WALKER. M. ISABELLE Quincy 

WALKEY, IDA B Saugus 

WARFIELD, RUTH E W. Brookfield 

WATERMAN, ADELE A. . . Hanover 

WHITE. LOUISA Providence. R. I. 

WHTTING, HELEN Boston 

WHITNEY, MARGUERITE Needham 

WIGHT, GENEVA A Natick 

WILLIAMS. FLORENCE M Lynn 

WINN. N. LILLIAN Winchester 

WOOD. MARGARET O Middleborough 

WORTHAM, MERLE Temple, Tex. 

YATES, MARGARET Boise, Ida. 

98 




mmzm 





dflUrge Okafcuat? OHub 




Waiters 

Madeleine McCrory 

President 

Margaret Watkins Shirley W. Wattles 

Vice-President Secretary 

Ruth W. Higgins 

Treasurer 

Marion E. Knowlton 
Representative at Student Guild Council 

Pauline Potter 
Representative at Committee on Student Conduct 




doling (JkafotratPB 

Name Home 

ABBOT, MIRIAM Worcester 

ANDERSON, HATTIE R La Crosse, Wis. 

ANTHONY, ELISABETH W Lewiston, Me. 

BACON, ISABEL C Cleveland, O. 

BALCH, MARION C Boston 

BARBER, ETHEL Iowa City, la. 

BARNUM, HELEN A Rochester, N. Y. 

BENNETT, BEATRICE Cambridge 

BLACKALL, MARTAN Cambridge 

BOTKIN, LOUISE F Caldwell, Ida. 

BRADBURY, KATHARINE L Somerville 

BROWN, ALICE F Buffalo, N. Y. 

BROWN,* HELEN G Ipswich 

BROW'NLEE, EDITH Brookline 

BURGESS, ELIZABETH Watertown 

BUSTARD, DOROTHY W Philadelphia Pa. 

BUTTERS, RUTH G Somerville 

CALLAGHAN, AGNES L Haverhill 

CAMPBELL* M. MARGARET Claremont, Cal. 

CAMPBELL, MARGARET P Manchester Ct. 

CANFIELD, AVIS B Providence, R. I. 

CARR, KATHERINE E. Orange, N. J. 

CATE, MILDRED R Salem 

CHAPMAN, WINNIFRED A Lewiston, Me. 

CLARK, HELEN M Wellsville, N. Y. 

CLARKSON, ALICE M Williamstown, Pa. 

CLEMENCE, HAZEL Worcester 

CLEMENT,* FANNIE F. . . Washington D. C. 

COLE,* GLADYS S ' Newton 

CUMMER,* BESSIE R Cleveland, O. 

DAVIS, CONSTANCE E St. Paul, Minn. 

DAY, ALICE B Newton 

DINEGAN, ALICE W Quincy 

DYER, ELIZABETH Boston 

EMERSON, RUTH V* Cambridge 

ENGLISH,* ELISABETH D Columbia, S. C. 

EWER, LOUISE F Bangor, Me. 

FAY* ADRA M Minneapolis, Minn. 

FLETT, P. TELMA Melrose 

FOSTER, ANNA E Westerly, R. I. 

GARDNER,* BEATRICE A Cambridge 

GIFFORD, CHARLOTTE E Whitby, Eng. 

GIFFORD,* FRANCES C Provincetown 

GOVE, LYDIA P Salem 

GREENLEAF, GLADYS M Lisbon Falls, Me. 

GRIMES, BERTHA A Lawrence 

GWIN, PEARLE Cedar, la. 

HALL* HELEN Minneapolis, Minn. 

HALL, MILDRED C Brockton 

HARDY, MARION L Boston 

HARRUB, DEBORAH H Taunton 

HASELTINE* ELIZABETH A Haverhill 

HAWGOOD, HELEN A E. Cleveland, O. 

HAWKRIDGE, EMMA L Boston 

HERMAN* MAIDA Boston 

HIGGINS, RUTH W Manchester, N. H. 

HILL, ALICE L Dedham 

*Not in residence. 



Name Home 

HILLIKER. KATHERINE E Lynn 

HOPKINS. EDNA P Topeka, Kan. 

HOXIE, LOUISE M Peace Dale R. I. 

HUNT, ELIZA R Weymouth 

JAMES, MARION P ' . ■ Berkeley, Cal. 

JOHNSON, ESTHER C Westbrook, Me. 

KENDALL. LOIS M /Ouino 

KENDALL, RAMONA L Fitchburg 

KENEALY, M. ELIZABETH Cleveland, O. 

KINGMAN, ETHEL S Somerville 

KNOWLTON, MARION E Newton 

LAUDER, MARGARET ' S. Norvvalk, Ct. 

LEONARD, FAITH Minneapolis, Minn. 

LINCOLN, CONSTANCE Belmont 

LITCHFIELD, RUBY Southbridge 

McCLURE,* H. MARIE Marietta O. 

McCRORY, MADELEINE Pelham, N. Y. 

MACKAY, RUTH Belmont 

McLAUGHLIN, HELEN F Manchester, N. H. 

MacNAUGHTON,* MARY E Fort Edward, N. Y. 

MAXCY, HELEN B Gardiner, Me. 

MERRITT, ANNA Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

MILLER, GRACE E Newton 

MITCHELL, FRANCES Watertown 

MORSE, SALLIE B Brockton 

MUDGEi* ADA Maiden 

MULLIN, ELIZABETH M Franklin, N. H. 

NELSON, HELEN A Laramie, Wyo. 

NEWHART, GRACE Minneapolis, Minn. 

NEWKIRK, MARY L Detroit, Mich. 

NOON, EDITH R Lunenburg 

NORRIS.* ETHEL L Melrose 

NORRIS, GRACE A Lexington 

O'BRIEN, MARY E Antigonish, N. S. 

OIESEN, NELLIE J. M Baltimore, Md. 

OLIVE, LIDA M Apex, N. C. 

OLIVER, MARY B Lisbon, N. H. 

OSGOOD, MARCIA C Peabody 

PARKER, EMMA H Charlestown, N. H. 

PARKER, MARION Orleans 

POTTER,* HOPE L Redlands, Cal. 

POTTER, PAULINE Eugene, Ore. 

PRATT, PAULINE H Massena, N. Y. 

RANDALL, ALIDA E Avoca, N. Y. 

RANKIN,* REBECCA B Ann Arbor, Mich. 

REYNOLDS,* BERTHA C Stoughton 

RICHARDSON, HELEN Columbus, O. 

RICHARDSON. MARION J Fairmont, Minn. 

RIPLEY, EMMA F Weston 

ROCKWOOD.* EMILY P Calais, Me. 

ROSENBERGER, LUCILE Whittier, Cal. 

ROYS, MARION E Berlin 

SHEARER,* HERMIONE Minneapolis, Minn. 

SHERMAN, ESTELLA M New York, N. Y. 

SIMPSON, ADA W Newburyport 

SMILEY, GRACE F Columbus, O. 

STILES, SARAH Grand Rapids, Mich. 

STONE, S. CLEONICE Cambridge 

TEARSE. HELEN H Winona, Minn. 

THOMPSON, GRACE W Dover 

*Not in residence. 



Name Home 

THOMSON, VERA B Hamilton, Ont. 

VAN KIRK, ANNE D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

VAN SLYKE, BERENICE K Lawton, Mich. 

VAN WINKLE, I. ANNA San Francisco, Cal. 

VILES, E. JOSEPHINE Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

WATKINS, MARGARET Milford 

WATTLES, SHIRLEY W Canton 

WATTS, ALICE M Rockville, Ct. 

WEBSTER, MARION C Chester, N. H. 

WESTON, FLORENCE M Minneapolis, Minn. 

WHEELER* ELEANOR P Chicago, 111. 

WHITEHOUSE, HELEN M Auburn, Me. 

WHITLEY, DOROTHY Newton 

WILLIAMS,* ALICE C E. Aurora, N. Y. 

WOLHAUPTER* ALICE C New Rochelle, N. Y. 

WOODBRIDGE* ELIZABETH D Williamstown 

WOODS, EMILY W Natick 

YOUNG, E. MARGUERITE Peabody 

*Not in residence. 




I03 



•Uttrlaaatftrii BtotontB 



i 

The following list includes students admitted under special conditions to pursue prescribed 
programmes. 

Name Home 

ALDRICH, MARION A Boston 

ALEXANDER, MARGARET Boston 

ANDERSON, LILLIAN M Boston 

ATKINSON, BLANCHE E. . Lowell 

BELLAIRE, JESSIE M Cresco, Pa. 

BRANDON, MARIE A Cambridge 

BRANT, PAULINE M Newton 

BROWN, LELA M Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

BULL, CHRISTINE R Kent, Ct. 

CRAIG, FANNIE E Milton 

CONNOR, ELLEN M Leavenworth, Kan. 

COPLAND, MARIE R Detroit, Mich. 

DEARBORN, M. GRACE S. Lee, N. H. 

DUTCH ER, JESSIE R Brooklyn, N. Y. 

EVERETT, FLORENCE M Milton 

FAY, MARION B Southborough 

FIELD, ANTOINETTE L Arlington 

FOGARTY, GRACE M Boston 

FULLER, HARRIET L New Haven, Ct. 

FURBUSH, ELLA Cambridge 

GAGE, MARY B Boston 

GIBLIN, MARY M Boston 

GIBSON, LOUISE Lowell 

HALL, MATILDA N Natick 

HAMILTON, LAURA E Old Orchard, Me. 

HAMMOND, ELIZABETH S Norwalk, Ct. 

HEALD, MADGE M Lovell, Me. 

HEATH. LUCY R Ankum, Va. 

HEMMEON, EMMA T Port Hastings, N. S. 

HILL, HELEN Arlington 

HOLDEN, GERTRUDE A Concord 

HUMPHREY, MABEL B Reading 

HUNTER, MARION G E. Orange, N. J. 

IRWIN, SARAH C Dayton, O. 

KELLAR, ETHEL B Fort Smith, Ark. 

LAMONT, GRACE Dillon, Mont. 

LYNCH, MARION G Springfield 

McCABE, JULIA A N. Attleborough 

MacKAY, ELEANOR C Somerville 

MARDEN, ANNA D Winchester 

MORIARTY, RUTH C Belmont 

MOWRY, FRANCES L Somerville 

MULLEN, EMILY M Milton 

NAGLE, MARIAN H Brooklme 

O'BRIEN, MARY E., a.b Antigomsh, N. S. 

PARMENTER, LAURA L Milton 

PARSONS, LEILA B Penn Yan, N. Y. 

PHAIL, EDITH New York. N. Y. 

PHILBRICK, ALICE E Newburyport 

PUTNAM, AUGUSTA W Wilton, N. H. 

QUINN, S. LIDA New York, N. Y. 

RANDALL, MABEL C Cambridge 

104 



Name Home 

RICHARDSON, PRUDENCE M Rangeley Me 

SARGENT, VILLA M Blue Hi'll Me. 

SCHWARZ, FLORENCE I Santa Barbara, Cal. 

SEAVER, A. CLEMMA Barton, Vt. 

SMITH, BERNICE M Danforth, Me. 

SMITH, JOSEPHINE E Taunton 

SODEN, FLORENCE J Cohoes, N V. 

STARLING, MAUD Plymouth, N. H. 

STITES, ELIZABETH Louisville, Ky. 

THOMPSON, LOUISE Chicago, III. 

TRIPP, BESSY D New Bedford 

VONNEGUT, IRMA Indianapolis, Ind. 

WEBER, HARRIET L Winchester 

WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH F Vinton, la. 

WILLIAMS, KATHARINE W Milton 

WILLIAMS, MAY E Belleville, N. Y. 

WOOD, ANNIE D Webster 

WRIGHT, M. EUNICE Boston 

ZEHRINGER, VICTORIA J Winthrop 

II 

The following list includes students admitted to pursue irregular or partial programmes. 

ABBOTT S. MYRTA Plymouth, O. 

ADAMS, VIDA B W. Tisbury 

BACON, ISABEL C, a.b Cleveland, O. 

BAILEY, CLARA F Machias, Me. 

BEANE, EDITH E Whitman 

BENNETT, BEATRICE, a.b Cambridge 

BILLINGS. BERTHA E New Salem 

BISSELL, EMILY W Morris, Ct. 

BOLTON, ANITA R Watertown 

BROCK. CHRISTINE Cambridge 

BROWN, ALICE F., a.b Buffalo, N. Y. 

BROWNLEE, EDITH, a.b Brookline 

BUCKLEY, GRACE M Winchester 

BURGESS, GERTRUDE A E. Orange, N. J. 

CABOT, ELEANOR Cambridge 

CABOT. FRANCES A Boston 

CADY, MARY L Brookline 

CARR, KATHERINE, a.b E. Orange, N. J. 

CARTER, ANNA B Leominster 

CATE, MILDRED R., s.b Salem 

CHANNING, ELIZABETH T Cambridge 

CHENEY, ELEANOR M. S. Manchester, Ct. 

COBB, BESSIE S • Somerville 

COIL, ALFREDA Marietta, O. 

CONNELL, MARY A Boston 

CROCKER. JULIA L Stoneham 

DYER, ELIZABETH, a.b Boston 

ELIOT, GRACE Brookline 

ENGLERT, ANNA E Milwaukee. Wis. 

FARNHAM, ADAH M Maiden 

FENN. DOROTHY Cambridge 

FISHER, FIDELIA H St. Johnsbury. Vt. 

FLYNN, CHARLOTTE M Boston 

FLYNN, ELIZABETH C. • Woburn 

FLYNN, PATRICIA A. C Boston 

FOLEY, GEORGIANA W Boston 



105 



Name Home 

FOSTER, ETHEL M Melrose 

FOSTER, MARGARET Boston 

GATES, LILLIAN H Machias, Me. 

GIFFORD, CHARLOTTE E., a.b Whitby, Eng. 

HALE, MARY S Sherbrooke, P. Q. 

HENDERSON, MARION M Hingham 

HIBBARD, GRACE R. Pittsfield 

HONNORS, CLAIRE E Somerville 

HORTON, ELIZABETH Middletown, N. Y. 

HUGHES, SARAH E Foxcroft, Me. 

HUSTED, MAUD Buffalo, N. Y. 

IACKSON, ROSETTA Boston 

JENCKES, AMY E Cambridge 

KENDALL, HARRIOTT Boston 

KENDALL, RAMONA L., a.b Fitchburg 

KENEALY, M. ELIZABETH, a.b Cleveland, O. 

KILHAM, MARGUERITE S Beverly 

KNODELL, MARY L Boston 

LAWRENCE, ELINOR Boston 

LINCOLN, MARGARET R Brookline 

LITTLEFIELD, HONOR W Kennebunk, Me. 

McGEORGE, RUTH S Kansas City, Mo. 

MARKLEY, DORIS E Mason City, la. 

MARQUAND, ELIZABETH Cambridge 

MARQUAND, MARGARET F Cambridge 

MAKSTOX, MARGARET N. Andover 

MARTIN, MARION Lowell 

NEWHART, GRACE, a.b Minneapolis, Minn. 

NOURSE, CAROLINE E . . . . Arlington 

NYE, ALMIRA C Boston 

PEASE, MURIEL C Boston 

PECK, WILDA C. S Lynn 

PENDERGAST, GERTRUDE N Boston 

PENNELL, HARRIETT R Boston 

PETERS, MARY E Bendersville, Pa. 

PITKIN MARGARET ". Boston 

READ, MARIAN M Cambridge 

REED, MARY B Boston 

RIVIERE, MARIE G Blois, France 

SLAUGHTER, JULIA B Boston 

SMITH, GRACE M ~ . Boston 

SPITZ, IRENE C Brookline 

STARK, M. ETHEL Boston 

STEVENS, MARGARET Boston 

STONE, ELIZABETH Boston 

TOWNSEND, BEATRICE '. Boston 

WENTWORTH, ELIZABETH K Boston 

WHITE, FRANCES E Keene, N. H. 

YOUNG. MIRIAM Boston 



1 06 







XX&G\ mmlmm \OZ$w 



(Hotmril flf tlj? (£mtfi 




Lillian F. Nisbet Edith Salisbury 

Marjorie T. Underwood Frances B. Banks, Treasurer 

Alice Livingston, Secretary Louisa H. Hardy 

f Margaret A. Potter Ava S. Bassett v Marion Y. Ostrander, Chairman 

Ruth K. Whiting, Vice-Chairman Elizabeth H. Burbank 



Marjorie Soper 
Miriam R. Breese 
Marion E. Knowlton 
Augusta W. Putnam 



By a vote of the Guild Council it was decided to try this year the plan 
of assigning each freshman to a senior adviser. At the present time, when 
the resident freshmen are by necessity left out of the dormitories, and when 
there is a large proportion of day girls, the bond thus made seems par- 
ticularly beneficial, and the resulting stimulus to college spirit is already 
apparent. The seniors appreciate this opportunity to know the freshmen, 
and the ties between 19 14 and 191 7 are becoming very strong. 

The annual conference of the Women's Intercollegiate Association for 
Student Government was held this year at Swarthmore College, and, as 
formerly, the Chairman of the Guild Council and the President of Dor- 
mitory Student Government were sent as delegates. It was most interesting 
to observe the difference in the amount of power held by the various members 
of the Association, the older ones having proved themselves capable of 
having practically absolute authority in matters pertaining to student 
conduct. The evidence which they showed of the fine spirit of honor under- 
lying the whole system of "self-government" was very inspiring to the 
younger members of the Association, and it is certain that Simmons as well 
as the many other colleges, will benefit greatly by its representation at the 
Conference. 



Tf TOkj^- 


\ <? 


& 


->l 



8. A. A. iExemtto Qlommttt? ? 




Constance G. Ekstrand, '14 
Gertrude F. Hussey, '16 Alice M. Ray, '15 Harriet Putnam, '15 
Treasurer Vice-President 

Marjorie Yates, '16 Margaret L. Gladwin, '17 
Secretary 

Lillian F. Nisbet, '14. Esther Richardson, '16 
President 



^tutmonfi (HoUeg? Atljleitr AsBoriattim 

In 191 1 when the Simmons Athletic Association was organized its 
aim and reason for being were not simply to take charge of the athletic 
activities of the College, but to use these common interests in furthering 
within classes and within the college as a whole a deeper feeling of unity 
than ever before. The Association works toward the same ideal now as it 
did then, but to reach a true realization of this ideal, it must have the 
support and interest of everyone. It would consider itself very poor indeed, 
if it could count in its membership only those who actively took part in the 
athletic contests. The events of tennis, basketball, baseball and track, in 
creating a generous admiration for the winners, whatever numerals they 
may wear, tend to develop strong class and college loyalty, and they are, 
therefore, among the most important factors in our college life. 




iEtt&mumntt 3nnb Okimmttt?? 




Edith L. Stearns, 191 6 Gladys A. Kimball, 19 14 
Natalie D. Betts, 1917 Marjorie Yates, 1916 Marie White, 1915 

Helena V. O'Brien, 1915 
Blanche A. Nelson, 191 7 Inez E. Bassett, 1914 

Frances S. Hughitt, 1914, Chairman Esther F. Tucker, 1916 



iEndnuiment iFmtfc 

Since the girls were very anxious to increase the Endowment Fund as 
much as possible this year, a committee was chosen at the beginning of 
November to organize the work. The committee has held two meetings 
both of which were for the purpose of planning new ways of making money. 

At the first meeting the girls decided that the "Mile of Pennies" was 
a matter of first importance. Last year $125 was turned in from this 
source, and this year about $60 has been received. Some of the strips have, 
of course, been lost, but about 400 of them remain. The committee's first 
efforts, therefore, were exerted in disposing of and calling in these strips. 
The Freshmen on the committee were asked to explain the purpose of the 
strips to their classmates and also to try to arouse enthusiasm among them 
for the Endowment Fund work in general. 

During December the Secretarial girls offered to typewrite theses and 
other matter for twenty-five cents an hour, the money to be turned over to 
the committee. Up to the present time, something between six and eight 
dollars has been received. 

The girls were also very much in favor of holding a tag-day as soon as 
possible, this to be a college affair, and each class to be represented by tags 
of its own color. It was hoped that everyone would enter into the spirit of 
the undertaking and also that competition could be worked up between the 
classes. Other events were talked of, which could be better managed later 
in the year. The committee is full of enthusiasm and is willing to work. 
They hope for and expect the cooperation of their classmates and anticipate 
a successful year. 







m 



_j 



ii>tutottt (internment (§fltea 




Marjorie Soper, Treasurer Ruth K. Whiting, President 
Marion Y. Ostrander, Vice-President 

Marcaret M. Clark, Secretary 




1914 iEirroroBm loarft 




Mary G. Pratt, 'is 
Dorothy B. Incus, '16 Mary B. McRory. '14 

Business Manager 
Marjory I. Barto, '14 Sarah F. Whitney, '14 Marion Y. Ostrander, '14 
Photographs Art Editor Assistant Business Manager 

Inez E. Bassett, '14 Gertrude Ford, '14 
Literary Editor Editor-in-Chief 

Marjorie A. Potwine, 'is Ruth K. Whiting, '14 
Grinds Editor 

The Microcosm Board wishes to express its gratitude for the great 
assistance given by Dr. Farley, Dr. Stiles and Miss Gertrude Barbour. 



GOOD NIGHT 



% W. 01. A. dabtet 




Gertrude F. Hussey, Treasurer Dorothy B. Inglis Nina A. Mason 
Bessie L. Jost, Vice-President 

Jennette R. Carpenter, Secretary Harriet Putnam 

o Edith Salisbury, President Sarah H. Le Valley 









IkvofiDNAl MEEtiNq 

SrilllENTS ROD in 

TllESQfr/MiStL 






V" 


— 1 


1 — 1 


cor 


L 














f . W. OL A. 

The formal activities of the Young Women's Christian Association 
closed last spring with a course of lectures on the subject of Christian 
Fundamentals. The speakers were: the Rev. Dr. Worcester, Mr. Butler, 
Mr. Richards, Mr. Stockdale, and Dean Hodges. 

In June five members of the Association attended the Annual Student 
Conference held at Silver Bay, Lake George. A large number of delegates 
is hoped for for next summer, for the ten days spent there are both pleasant 
and profitable. 

The schedule of meetings for this year has been much the same as 
formerly. Devotional meetings, conducted both by student and outside 
leaders, have been held in the Students' Room, and a course of Bible study 
has been under consideration. 

In December Miss Josephine Perry attended the meeting of the Inter- 
national Student Volunteer Convention which was held in Kansas City. 
This is the first time in its history that the College has been represented at 
the great world Conference, and the report brought back by Miss Perry was 
full of interest to those who heard her speak. 

During the mid-year examinations tea was served in the Students' 
Room for all who cared to go. To those who attended, these teas were a 
most welcome experiment, and it is thought that in the future this plan will 
be followed out for the sake of the student body. 



«^a?SHIJ!5? 



»** 







lag 



Those who have never attended a big conference cannot imagine what 
the Y.W.C.A. Eastern Student Conference at Silver Bay means. Silver 
Bay on Lake George is as beautifully situated, with the blue sky, gray moun- 
tains, pine forests, and mountain lake, as one can picture. The leaders 
whom one meets there come from many parts of the world; they are of 
different races, dealing with different problems, and they are so full of lite 
and work that they make one want to be the same. The six hundred college 
girls are chosen from those who are active in college. They present dif- 
ferent outlooks and problems. They have varied opinions and attitudes. 

The program of the ten days is a sane mixture of rest, work, and play. 
Rest comes in the form of quiet hours, when one may write letters, or 
read, or, perhaps, just lie flat out on the pine needles under the tall trees, 
and do nothing at all. The work is carried on by the above mentioned 
leaders in classes, lectures and meetings. One never has to attend them, 
but, strange to say, usually wants to go to all of them. In recreation there 
is a wide choice: — basketball, swimming, tennis, boating, and walking. 
What is worth more than all else is the atmosphere of healthy right living 
and right thinking. It is necessary, however, to attend one of these con- 
ferences in order to appreciate them, and it is hoped that that is just what 
the girls are going to do in the coming years. 





g,Bas&ai \lWMWv w ft a.rF! 



6. 



mmms 



|g 




Jreattents of BUU (tabs 




Florence B. Gallant Frances M. Dunning 

Constance G. Ekstrand Frances S. Hughitt L. Margaret Perley 



BtnU (Uluba 

During this year and last there have been formed at Simmons College 
six State Clubs, representing New York, Maine, New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont, Ohio, and New Jersey. These clubs were formed primarily out of 
the love of good fellowship and for the purpose of promoting friendship. 
A second purpose of their organization is to strengthen college spirit among 
the alumnae and to keep the graduates in touch with their College. This 
is the more important object of the two. While the girls are at College 
good comradeship and loyalty to Simmons seem a matter of course. From 
one end of the four years to the other entertainments and "spreads" and, 
not least of all, the common ground of work make the girls all one, a united, 
"live and die for you" sort of people. But afterwards it is all different. 
A girl is not able to drop into her next door neighbor's room and discuss 
everything from the state election to what dress she is going to wear under 
her gown when she graduates. She is going to forget that there is a class of 
Freshmen struggling along in Physics and that somewhere there are a 
hundred or more Seniors trying to decide upon an original and previously 
unknown "theory of right and wrong" the night before Easter vacation. 
That is, she is going to forget, if she has nothing to remind her. And 
this is just what the State Clubs are for. They are going to hold all the 
girls of a state together, the students of the College, the girls who have 
gone out, and the girls who are planning to come to Simmons. Anybody 
belonging to a certain state can belong to her State Club and will belong 
to it; and no matter how forgetful she may be, she will never be allowed 
to forget what Simmons College is to her and what she is to Simmons 
College. 



»R : (HI 





iEustral AsHflriattmt 

©fitrfrs 

Louisa H. Hardy, '14, President 

Kathryn T. Gordon, '15, Secretory-Treasurer 

(glrr (Elrtb 

Miss Mabel W. Daniels, Leader 
Edith Salisbury, Manager Marguerite R. Schwartz, '15, Secretary-Treasurer 

Mmimlm GlUtb 

Ellen S. Daniels, '15, Manager 
Anita M. Allen, '15, Leader 

With Miss Daniels as leader, the Glee Club and Choir are doing 
especially good work. The music which they have taken up this year 
has been much more difficult than has been attempted before, and the girls 
have taken hold of it with a great deal of enthusiasm. There are several 
members who have proved themselves well able to undertake solo work. 
Since the membership of both the Glee Club and the Choir is limited, 
there is at present a long waiting list for each. 

In the Choir there are two divisions of forty voices, each of which 
sings at Assembly on alternating weeks. There has been more solo work 
this year than formerly, and the girls appear to be very much interested 
in what they are doing for the service. The Choir sang at the Memorial 
Service for Professor Nichols in January, and was also invited to assist at 
a special vesper service in Harvard Church. 

Aided by the Mandolin Club, the Glee Club gives two concerts each 
year, one in March, and the other in June. The Mandolin Club, aside 
from the work done with the Glee Club, has been called upon at various 
times to assist at entertainments in the college, and it has come to be con- 
sidered one of the fixed organizations of Simmons. 

PROGRAM 

March, 19 14 

1 Spinning Song from "The Flying Dutchman" . . Wagner 

Glee Clue 

2 Cantasane Waltzes H. F. Odell 

Mandolin Club 

3 Selections 

Double Quartette 

4 Melody in F Rubenstein 

Mandolin Club 

5 a On Music's Wing Mendelssohn 

b Amaryllis • . Parlor 

Glee Club 

6 Solos 

7 The Colonnade I. H. Odell 

Mandolin Club 

8 Fate Song 

Solo by Elizabeth Kennison 

9 Grinds 

10 Alma Mater 



iEanbnlttt Olluh 




©If? Hormttorij Uppers 



Every Sunday evening after supper a vesper service is held in the 
living-room of the North Hall. Another service is conducted at Peter- 
borough House. Formerly the meeting was held only every other week, 
but this year it has been decided to have vespers every week, alternating 
between a musical service and a special speaker. 

The Christmas vespers were held in the Church of the Disciples on 
Sunday afternoon, December fourteen. The trustees, advisory council, 
instructors and students were invited to attend. Dr. Farley conducted the 
service, and Miss Arnold and Dr. Lefavour each gave most interesting talks. 
It is hoped that this Christmas service will become one of the regular occur- 
rences of the college year. 




VARSITY TEAM OF 1913-I4 

H. M. Anderson, 1914, forward Lillian F. Nisbet, 1914, guard 

Marjorie Yates, forward (manager) E. Richardson, guard 

1 C. G. Ekstrand, 19 14, center 



SUB-VARSITY OF 1913-14 

H. Putnam, 19 15, forward M. Titcomb, 191 5, guard 

A. M. Ray, 1915, forward A. S. Bassett, 1914, guard 

M. D. Wheeler, 1916, center 




The series of inter-class Basketball games for 19 12-13 was played 
before the spring vacation in order to avoid the difficulty of the previous 
season, when the year ended before the matches had been played. The 
series consisted of three games, the first being played on March 7, when 
1 9 14 defeated 19 16 with a score of 24 — 17. The second game, played on 
March 11 between 19 13 and 191 5, resulted in a score of 20 — 21 in favor 
of 191 5. 1 9 14 finally won the cup from 1915 on March 14 with a score 
of 50 — 9. 



laarball 



The Athletic Association was very desirous of making baseball of more 
importance this year than ever before. The girls felt the need of some 
activity to take the place of basketball, all match games of which were over 
by the middle of March, and it was thought that baseball could best serve 
the purpose. To this end managers were chosen for the different classes, 
that they might organize teams and start work at as early a date as possible. 
Indoor training was carried on while the regular diamond was still unfit for 
use but as soon as the ground and the weather permitted, outdoor practice 
was taken up with great enthusiasm. The managers are Gertrude F. Baker, 
Lorna Pinnock, Mildred Bouve, and Louise P. Johnson, 




jjV jfflirxwosjfcl^ij 




H. M. Anderson, forward 
I. E. Bassett, forward 



1914 

G. L. Abbott, guard (manager) 
A. S. Bassett, guard 
L. F. Nisbet, guard 
C. G. Ekstrand, center (captain) 



SFXOND TEAM 

R. W. Ashley, forward L. H. Hardy, guard 

L. G. Brown, forward D. Tyacke, guard 

G. F. Baker, center 

D. M. Davol, center 



130 




1915 

H. Putnam, forward G. E. Minott, guard 

A. M. Ray, forward M. Titcomb, guard (captain) 

E. R. McDowell, center 



L. L. Mirick 

H. V. O'Brien 

M. A. Libby (manager) 



J. E. Thomas 
H. C. Williams 




$W jffirroros 





1 9 1 6 

Marjorie Yates, forward (manager) E. Richardson, guard 

L. Wright, forward G. F. Hussey, guard (captain) 

M. D. Wheeler, center 



SUBS 



E. L. Woods 
M. L. Shaw 



M. Stevens 
M. A. Whiting 




he jflirvorPsJffcH if 




1917 

M. Craig, forward J. McMullen, guard (manager) 

M. Gladwin, forward M. Driscoll, guard 

C. Ricker, center (captain) 



M. Spooner, forward 
O. Anson, forward 



SI'.COXD TEAM 



R. Colby, center 



M. Bowman, guard 
L. Johnson, guard 




aknms Qfrmrtmmroi 

The finals for the annual fall singles in tennis were played off on Sat- 
urday, November i. This was not the date originally set by the tennis 
committee, but the one forced upon them by the continued rains during the 
month of October. Although it was far too cold to be an ideal day for 
tennis, players and spectators all made the best of the weather, and the 
spirit of the day was by no means chilled. 

Helen M. Anderson played for the seniors, Olive C. Ruby for the 
juniors, Mildred Bouve for the sophomores, and Eleanor R. Gregory for 
the freshmen. It was decided by lot that the semi-finals should be played 
off between the representatives of sister classes. Miss Anderson defeated 
Miss Bouve with a score of 6 — 2, 10 — 8, and Miss Ruby defeated Miss 
Gregory with a score of 6 — 4, 6 — 3. In the final match between Miss 
Anderson and Miss Ruby, Miss Anderson secured the cup for her class 
with the score of 6 — 1 in two sets. 

There was no match between the college graduates and the special 
students, the cup going to Miss Katherine E. Hilliker, the college graduate, 
owing to the default of Miss Irma Vonnegut, who was to represent the 
special students. 

Dr. Underwood and Mr. Schaeffer acted as umpires. 

After the final match Miss Anderson was presented with the cup and 
the other players with numerals by the President of the Athletic Association. 





The third annual track meet took place in the athletic field, Saturday 
morning, May 10, 1913, temperature 40. It was an ideal morning for the 
participants and many sweaters, supplemented by an enthusiastic spirit, kept 
the rest warm. During the meet the Sophomores sold ice cream and lemon- 
ade, the proceeds of which were for the Endowment Fund, and the girls 
proved themselves cheerful martyrs to the cause. Another noticeable 
feature was the fan carried by every loyal Junior. 



M. Donaldson 
E. Walker 
C. Babcock 



ENTRIES FOR TRACK 
1913 



A. Porter (manager) 
M. Moses 



L. Nisbet 

A. Bassett 

G. Baker 

G. Abbott (manager) 

M. Potter 



I. Bassett 

R. Ashlev 

D. Tvacke 

M. A. McCarthy 



M. Libby 
G. Minott 
M. Potwine 
L. Logan 

G. Hussey (manager) 

E. Richardson 

M. Yates 

M. Bouve 

M. Wheeler 

O. Titus 



1916 



E. Kennison (manager) 

O. Ruby 

M. Ring 

H. O'Brien 




M. 



K. McCarthy 

S. Russell 

R. Hammond 

M. Stevens 

M. O'Brien 

E. Wilson 




The several events were run off in fine form. The relay race and the 
50-yard dash were omitted on account of lack of time, much to the disap- 
pointment of the girls, who had trained for these only. 

The events resulted as follows: 





Running H 


igh Jump 






4 feet, 4^ inches 
4 feet, 3y 2 inches 

4 feet, 2j4 inches 


Won by 
Second 

Tie for third place 
Basketball Throw 


G. Minott, 

A. Bassett, 

[ R. Ashley, 

1 E. Wilson, 


'15 
'14 
'14 
'16 


65 feet, \y 2 inches 
03 feet, 33/2 inches 
61 feet, 8 inches 


Won by 

Second 

Third 

Shot 


Put 


L. Nisbet, 
M. Libby, 
M. Yates, 


'i4 
'15 
'16 


26 feet, 8y 2 inches 
23 feet, 1 y 2 inches 
22 feet, 3 inches 


Won by 

Second 

Third 

Baseball 


Throw 


L. Nisbet, 
M. Yates, 

M. Donaldson, 


'14 
'16 
'13 


152 feet, 5 inches 
137 feet, 8 inches 
127 feet, 11 inches 


Won by 

Second 
Third 




G. Hussey, 
M. Libby, 
A. Bassett, 


'16 
14 







[2 feet, 7 
t2 feet, 4 
12 feet, 3 



inches 
inches 
inches 



Running Broad Jump 
Won by 
Second 
Third 



7 feet, 33 
7 feet, 2 
6 feet, 8 

On 



2 hr., I] 
2 hr., ii 



Standing Broad Jump 
4 inches Won by 

inches Second 

inches Third 

May 3 the five and ten mile walks took place. 

Ten Mile Walk 
min., IO sec. Tie for first place < 

min., 50 sec. Third 



G. Hussey, 
G. Minott, 
E. Walker, 



G. Minott, 

M. Stevens, 

R. Hammond, 



M. Ring, 

M. K. McCarthy, 

G. Baker, 



hr., 5 min. 
hr., 6 min. 



Five Mile Walk 
Tie for first place 
Third 



( A. Bassett, '14 

( L. Nisbet, '14 

M. A. McCarthy, ' 14 



The meet was won by 19 14, with a score of 24^ points; 19 15 was 
second with 23 points; 191 6 was third with 22^ points; and 191 3 was 
fourth with 2 points. L. Nisbet had the highest individual score of 14 
points; G. Minott was second with 13 points; and G. Hussey was third with 
10 points. 






| \^ jLiiboo ttisM ^P^ 




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\ HB >*. ^ a< \) of4(e y °^ e ^/ 




SIMMONS COLLEGE 
COMMENCEMENT WEEK, 1913 



SUNDAY, June 8 

Baccalaureate Service, in the Church of 
the Disciples, Jersey Street, at 4 o'clock 
Sermon by the Reverend Ambrose W 
Vernon, D D., Minister of the Harvard 
Church, Brookline 

MONDAY, June 9 

Senior Dance, in South Hall (321 Brookline 
Avenue) at 8 o'clock 

TUESDAY, June 10 

Class-Day Spread on the Dormitory 

Campus at 5 o'clock 
Concert by the Glee and Mandolin Clubs, in 

South Hall at 8 o'clock 
Glee Club Dance: in South Hall at 10 o'clock 

WEDNESDAY, June 11 

Commencement Exercises: in the Church 
of the Disciples at 11 o'clock Address by 
the Reverend George A. Gordon, D. D., 
Minister of the Old South Church, Boston 

Luncheon and Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association . m the College Building imme- 
diately after the Commencement Exercises 

Reception by President Lefavour to the 
Alumnae and their friends, in South Hall at 
8 o'clock 

THURSDAY, June 12 

Senior Luncheon . in South Hall at 1 o'clock 




larralattreate &?rmr? 

QUjurrlj of lift liartplro 

Sunday, June Eighth, IQ13 
Order of Worship 
Organ Prelude 

Processional Hymn (Tune, All Saints) R. Heber 

Invocation 

The Twenty-Third Psalm 

Anthem Mendelssohn 

I waited for the Lord, He inclined unto me, He heard my 
complaint. O blessed are they that hope and trust in the Lord. 
Scripture Lesson 
Prayer 

Hymn (Tune, Duke Street) J. G. W hit tier 

Baccalaureate Sermon, The Reverend Ambrose W. Vernon, D.D. 
Minister of the Harvard Church, Brookline 
Prayer and Benediction 
Recessional Hymn (Tune, St. Leonard) A. A. Proctor 

Organ Postlude 

140 



1 Waldmere 

2 Carmena 



PROGRAM 

June io, 1913 

Mandolin Club 
Glee Club 



3 Hungarian Dance 

4 Solos 



F. H. Sosey 

Lane-Wilson 

No. 5 Brahms 



a Happy Song Del Riego 

b In the Time of Roses Reinhardt 

c Love in May Horatio Parker 

d In the Dark . . . . ■ . Mabel W. Daniels 
Mrs. Ethel Walcott Ross 

5 a The Little Creek Goes Winding Arthur Foote 

(Dedicated to the Choral Society of Simmons College. 
Repeated by request.) 

b It Was a Lover and His Lass Chadwick 

Glee Club 

6 La Petite Etrangere Metcalf 

Mandolin Club 

7 a Cross Ole Chilly Sherwood 

Solo by Marjorie Soper 

, ^ . . (i The Frivolous Freshman 
b Grmds 1 2 Subjects 

Solo by Elizabeth Kennison 

8 Alma Mater 





Wednesday, June Eleventh, IQ13 
Order of Exercises 
Prayer, The Reverend James Austin Richards 

Minister of the Mount Vernon Church, Boston 
Commencement Hymn 
Address, The Vision on the Way, 

The Reverend George Angier Gordon, D.D. 
Minister of the Old South Church, Boston 
Anthem, Veni Creator Spiritus 
Conferring of Degrees 

The Candidates for the Bachelor's degree presented by the Dean of the 

College 
The Candidate for the Master's degree presented by PROFESSOR 
Brackett in behalf of the Department of Social Work 
Award of Certificates 
College Hymn 
Benediction 





be fBirroros, 





Stye i^nta IGmtrljttm 

Toasts 
The Basis of Right and Wrong, 
Spelling plus Arithmetic Equals a Degree, 
The Man, 
Unpublished Facts, 
After this, the Deluge, 
Twelfth Night, or What You Will, 



Mildred H. Starrett 

Helen G. Agate 

Olive E. Diall 

H. Irene Weed 

Marie W. Gurdy 

Elizabeth M. Walker 



'13, the class of jollity and jest, 
'13, a little better than the rest, 
'13, the dearest, fairest, best, 
We drink to thee." 





Evening soft and breezes low, 
Moon rides in the sky, 
Thirteen's graduated now 
And we must say "Good-bye.' 
Farewell, thirteen, 
Wish you good luck, too, 
Only don't forget that we 
Always shall love you. 




144 




RUDDYGORE 

"Ruddygore, 4 ' a Gilbert and Sullivan opera, was presented by the 
Lend-a-Hand Dramatic Club, partially for the benefit of the Endowment 
Fund of Simmons College, on the evening of March 5, 19 13. The opera 
was staged under the direction of the Misses Estabrook, Rankin, Freeman 
and Diaz. 

The committee for the Simmons College Endowment Fund was : 

Ella J. Rose, Chairman 
Hazel Harmon, Business Manager 
Marion E. Knowlton Katherine M. Murphy 

Gladys A. Kimball Marjorie A. Potwine 

Mary J. Harrison 




Photographs by Bachrach 




SENIOR SERENADE 

All that week of prom, and dresses 
We had waited for the seniors 
Forth to come to serenade us, 
Monday, Tuesday we had waited : 
But on Wednesday, we'd decided, 
They would surely come to tell us 
In their songs composed at Gloucester, 
How they loved their junior schoolmates. 

So, when off we saw a senior 
Walk with suitcase quite apparent 
Or her cap tucked under one arm, 
Stealthy, cautious in her manner, 
Or whene'er we neared her presence, 
As she talked in silent corners 
With another whispering maiden, 
And she quickly changed her subject, 

Do you wonder that we juniors, 
Watching, keen, observing juniors, 
Thought the night had come of all nights 
When the seniors songs would sing us? 
And when dinner time drew nearer 
And the few remaining seniors 
Slowly wandered off and left us, 
Do you wonder we were certain? 

So we caref'ly set our watches 
To await the coming seniors 
With their gayly-lighted lanterns. 
Could not catch us juniors sleeping! 
Then about eleven-thirty, 
When we all were getting anxious, 
Skulked a shadow in the darkness — 
Then another and another. 



Quick a message spread like wild-fire 
'Round among the waiting juniors. 
Wrapped in sweaters, rugs and blankets 
Flocked we to the colonnade top. 
There we sat all still and quiet. 
Ranged against the sky like mummies 
Sat the poor deluded juniors. 
Pretty sight for laughing seniors ! 

For the seniors now returning 
(Castle Square or some cheap theater!) 
Saw us sitting on the roof top, 
Laughed, then off to bed betook them. 
And we poor deluded juniors 
Had to leave our lofty station; 
But undaunted, not discouraged, 
Bound to turn the tables somehow. 

Just at midnight by the church bells 

Out upon the peaceful night-air 

Burst the song of nineteen-fourteen. 

Waked the seniors snug within doors. 

'Round a fire between the houses 

Danced the juniors singing class-songs. 

Then a hush fell 'round the fire-pit. 

Then what passed? What did those juniors? 

JUNIOR PROM. 

On the evening of April 26, 1913, the class of nineteen-fourteen held 
its Junior Prom, in the Refectory. In the receiving line were President 
Lefavour, Dean Arnold, Dr. and Mrs. Norris, Miss Williams, Miss Glos- 
ter, Mr. Goodell and Miss Ostrander, President of the junior class. 

The ushers were members of the sophomore class and included the 
officers— Anita M. Allen, Kathryn T. Gordon, Hilda C. Williams and 
Evelyn Emerson — and the following girls: Lena C. Beecher, Helen H. 
Cary, Elizabeth L. Kennison and Marjorie A. Potwine. 

The chairmen of the committees in charge were: Ruth K. Whiting, 
Decorations; Edna E. Perry, Supper; Marjorie Parmley, Invitations and 
Orders; Anita Q. Clark, Music and Floor; Ruth B. Klein, Invitations to 
Former Members; Paula F. Mueller, Dormitory. 

SOIREE 
On the Saturday following Prom, the junior class entertained their 
guests in the afternoon with a theatre party at the Shubert, where Emma 
Trentini was playing in "The Firefly." In the evening there was an in- 
formal dance held in the reception rooms of North and South Halls. 
Frances Hughitt acted as chairman of the committee in charge. 
149 



Mm 




Sag 



Ye May Day was greeted with much merriment and song by many 
maidens. Early in ye morning they of the class of nineteen fifteen arose 
and awakened their sister class by many a song suggestive of ye early spring 
time. Dainty May baskets were hung and ye May pole was wound as 
sweet maids were wont to wind it in ye days of Merrie England. A repast 
appropriate to May Day was set out upon ye lawn and all partook. Then 
they of nineteen fifteen crowned as their "Queen o' the May" ye President 
of that class which had acted unto them in a manner sisterly, which ceremony 
completed with due festivity their greeting of ye sweet month o' May. 





THE AMAZONS 

On Saturday afternoon and evening, May 3, 1913, the college grad- 
uates presented Pinero's "The Amazons" for the benefit of the Simmons 
College Endowment Fund. The cast was well chosen and the entire per- 
formance reflected much credit on the players. 

The cast was : 

Barrington, Viscount Litterly LouiSE R. Ufford 

Galfred, End of Tweenways Faith W. Elliott 

Andre, Count de Grival Faith T. Lanman 

Rev. Roger Minchin Mary E. MacNaughton 

Fitton {a gamekeeper) ~\ 

Youatt {a servant) V Eloise G. Grafton 

Orts (a poacher) . . ) 

Miriam, Marchioness of Castlejordan Dorothy E. Brewer 

Lady Noeline Belturbet Genevieve Burdick 

Lady Wilhemina Belturbet Beatrice A. Gardner 

"Sergeant" Shuter Evelyn H. Aldrich 

The committee in charge was: 

Evelyn H. Aldrich 
Emily Sibley 
Mary B. Pillsbury 
Caroline G. Sawyer 
Jane Blood 
Ida L. Brooks 




The class of 191 6 gathered in the Refectory on Saturday afternoon, 
May 10, 1 913, to enjoy their Freshman Frolic. The party was unique, 
in that it was attended by many "trade marks" of well known advertise- 
ments, that frolicked together and competed in a mock track meet. 
The committee was: 

Gertrude F. Hussey, Chairman 
Margaret V. Thompson 
Leone M. Foote 





SophomorE 

LuNCHEoN Jr\ 



On Saturday, May 17, 1913, the class of nineteen fifteen enjoyed their 
Sophomore Luncheon, one of the pleasantest occasions in the career of 
the class. Miss Elizabeth Freeman acted as toast-mistress. The responses 
were : 



Household Economics, 
Library School, 
School of Science, 
Secretarial School, 
Simmons Athletic Association, 
Class of 1915, 



Mary G. Pratt 

Marian F. Cross 

Martha D. Ring 

Marguerite Stevens 

Mildred A. Lie-by 

Anita M. Allen, Pres. 



The committee to whom the class is indebted for the success of their 
luncheon was : 

Rhea M. Gillespie, Chairman 
Elizabeth K. F. Freeman 
Harriet Putnam 
Hazel Kilbourn 
Caroline D. Sparrow 
Louise R. Whitcomb 
Evelyn Emerson 
Hilda C. Williams 



^-^A—l _ *^^ 




Wk^ 



JUNIOR-SENIOR PICNIC 

Happy are the thoughts aroused by the recollection of the junior-senior 
outing at Nantasket ! Late in May the classes of nineteen thirteen and 
fourteen spent a day picnicking at the beach, and together put aside the trials 
and tribulations of the regular routine for a day of fun and frolic. The 
"Betty Alden" was engaged by the picnickers, and the jollity of the boat ride 
was not in the least degree marred by the occasional mists and the general 
grayness of the day. 

The committee in charge of the outing consisted of Jennette R. Car- 
penter and Marjorie Parmley. 



Progr 



SIMMONS COLLEGE 
1913 



Program- Tea 

CTORY APRIL 5. 1913 




On Saturday afternoon, October 25, the sophomore class entertained 
the seniors, their sister class, at luncheon. The tables were artistically 
decorated with the class colors, and the girls wore ribbons and flowers ap- 
propriate to the occasion. During the luncheon the two classes sang to 
each other the songs which they had written for that purpose. 

Those on the committee were Frances E. Hall (chairman), Adele 
Chandler, Clara L. Munger, Marjorie Soper and Lucile W. Hill. 



SOPHOMORE-FRESHMAN PARTY 

The refectory was the scene of a The Dansant Saturday afternoon, 
January 10, at which the class of nineteen sixteen entertained nineteen 
seventeen. The party was a very pretty one, and the program was a pleas- 
ant surprise to the guests. 

The committee was: Katharine M. Leonard, Gertrude F. Hussy, 
Ruth Hammond, Lucile W. Hill, and Margaret Burns. 



STUDENT GUILD RECEPTION 

On Saturday afternoon, the twentieth of September, the Student 
Guild held its annual reception in the refectory. President Lefavour, Miss 
Marion Y. Ostrander, Miss Ruth K. Whiting, Miss Alice C. Livingston, 
and Miss Frances B. Banks were in the receiving line. The welcoming com- 
mittee of the class of nineteen fifteen acted as ushers. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT DANCE 

The Student Government Association gave a dance to the entering 
students on the evening of September 26. Those who formed the receiving 
line were: Dean Arnold, Miss Gloster, Mrs. Freeman, Miss Ruth K. 
Whiting, Miss Marion Y. Ostrander, Miss Margaret M. Clark, and Miss 
Marjorie Soper. Those on the committee in charge were the Misses 
Helene A. Boehmke, Winona C. Hyland, Dorotha K. Perry, and Lydia 
M. Woodbridge. 




THE MAGISTRATE 

On November 8, 19 13, the Simmons Club of Boston presented Pinero's 

"The Magistrate" for the benefit of the Simmons Club Fund. The cast 

was as follows : 

Beatie Tomlinson Madelaine L. Scott >- 

Cis Farrington Glenna M. True t 

Wyke Susie James 

Popham Catharine Casassa 

Agatha Posket Dorothy Fay \ ■ 

Mr. Posket Gertrude J. Burnett 

Mr. Bullamy Mabel A. Magee 

Charlotte fen REBECCA S. GROSS ° ° 

hadore Phoebe Freeman 

Achille Blond Beui.ah C. Hatch 

Colonel Lukyn Ruth Harrington 

Captain Horace Yale Margaret RlDLON * 

Inspector Messiter Florence C. Sargent 

Constable Harris Susie James 

The committee in charge was: Miss Grace A. Knight, Miss Madelaine 

L. Scott, Miss Beatrice Polsey, Miss Judith Smith, and Miss Helen E. 

Home. 





ALICE IN COLLEGELAND 

The class of nineteen fifteen entertained the entering class on the after- 
noon of October 25 with a burlesque entitled "Alice in Collegeland." 
Those who took part were : 

dike Marjorie Shaw 

The Rabbit Eileen A. Colonna 

The College Mouse Rhea M. Gillespie 

The Cat(alogue) Mildred A. Libby 

The Hatter • Mary G. Pratt 

The Turtle Anita M. Allen 

The Gryphon Lena C. Beecher 

The King of Marks Laura F. Thompson 

The Queen of Marks Elsey W. Larkin 

The entertainment committee was: 

Marjorie A. Potwine, Chi 
Dorothy Throssell 
Ada E. Alexander 
Margaret M. Sprague 
Hilda C. Williams 
Mary A. Pinkham 
Anne T. Upham 




THE CHRISTMAS PARTY 

On December thirteen all was bright and cheerful within the refectory, 
for the Christmas Spirit was abroad. While dinner was being served 
Santa Claus and a bountiful Christmas tree caused much merriment, and 
the carols which were sung underneath the windows proved to be a most 
pleasing innovation for those within doors. 

In the course of the evening an entertainment was offered for which 
the guests were indebted to Dr. and Mrs. Farley, Miss Mitzlaff, Miss 
Hattie R. Anderson, Miss Marjorie Soper, Miss Beatrice Nardini, and 
the Mandolin Club. 




SENIOR HOUSE PARTY 




COLONIAL INN 



OCTOBER 10-13, 1913 




SCITUATE, MASS. 




TEAS 

To meet your friends and have a chaT, 
To catch a glimpse of some new haT, 
To find out where the College's aT, 
To get a bite of this and thaT, 
We go to Teas. 



September 2 2, Y. W. C. A. 

October 3, Senior (South Hall) 

October 4, S. A. A. 

October 7, New York State Club (South Hall) 

November 5, Y. W. C. A. 

November 13, Freshman 

November 14, Sophomore 

November 20, Instructors 

November 21, Freshman 

December 1, Senior 

December 7, Junior (North Hall) 

December 18, Instructor 

January 8, New Hampshire State Club (South Hall) 

January 15, Senior (North Hall) 

January 22, Y. W. C. A. 

January 23, Y. W. C. A. 

January 26, Y. W. C. A. 

January 27, Y. W. C. A. 

February 12, Senior 




THE SENIORS' MARCH 



The Seniors march at Chapel, 
Each Wednesday afternoon. 
Instead of marching to a march, 
They choose a slow hymn tune. 

They take a step and then they pause 
And balance on one toe, 
Until the organ booms again 
Then one more step they go. 

And so on up the aisle proceed 

In awful indecision; 

Sometimes a mile 'tween each two pairs, 

Sometimes abrupt collision. 

We really mean no disrespect, 

We only think, it's funny. 

Why not enlarge th' Endowment Fund 

And do your stunt for money? 




£e 



ffli 



irroros 





GOOD NIGHT! 

"Sleep sweet within this quiet room, 
O thou whoe'er thou art, 
Nor let sad thoughts of yesterdays 
Disturb thy peaceful heart." 



Du bist wie meine Quiz Buch, 
Ich wiinsche dead zu sein, 
Und ach! das dreadful Murder 
Kommt mir ins Herz hinein. 



That "brevity is the soul of wit" 
Is not quite clear to me, 
But the Stenotype girls are sure of it, 
As you can plainly see. 

(See Stenotypy translation at left.) 



I" m learming how to tupe right well 
' * L s and eaxh day liJ^e it vetter 

J R T 

% e s . s EXcept the tine s that i get nixed 

s 

alJd Miss the prop er letter, . 




le jHif rocosff 




A Tie.xi^n.6 St 




SOME LETTERS THAT I SHOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE 



Dear Miss Rusht: 

Don't hurry in with your reserve book tomorrow morning I sh; 
be glad to take it upstairs for you whenever you come. You will nnd n 
waiting by the elevator. 

Respectfully yours, 

Thad. 



Dear Miss Rusht: 

Several times recently I have observed you making frequent trips to 
the library. I wish that I could make you see that it is for your own 
welfare that you are not tired out by physical exercise. Can 1 not induce 
you to substitute this for an hour of Gymnasium work each week.' 

Faithfully yours, 

F. S. D l. 



Ke SHARK 




Dear Miss Rusht: 

You looked so drawn when I met you in the corridor the other day 
that I thought perhaps you were worrying about your marks. There is 
really no need for this, for the Typewriter Co. has not yet had an oppor- 
tunity to repair the E's and F's which we wore out when the last five-weeks 
marks went in. 

Faithfully yours, 

M. B-RB-NK. 



Dear Miss Rusht: 

I have observed that you are becoming somewhat fagged of late, and 
would suggest that you owe it to yourself and to the College to conserve 
your strength. Ergo would you consider remaining at home for the next 
few days in order to recuperate? 

Sincerely yours, 

B. M. P-LLSB-RY. 



Dear Miss Rusht: 

We have looked up your schedule and find that your fourth hour classes 
on Monday, Wednesday and Friday are on the third floor. This being the 
case, we have wondered if it would not be more convenient to have us 
reserve a table for your use on these days. 

Lovingly yours, 

The Lunchroom Committee. 




She washed the emptied jelly-glass 
And stood it up to dry, 
And then she washed the paraffin 
And stood it safely by. 

But sometime later when she looked, 
"Alas! Alack!" cried she, 
"Now, who has seen my paraffin, 
Oh, dear, where can it be?" 

"Where was it put?" they all inquired, 
And with an injured air, 
She said, "I merely stood it on 
The radiator there." 



Chemistry Student: Have you heard the awful thing about the arti- 
ficial camphor? 

Freshman: No, what happened? 

Chemistry Student: Why, it was enough to make a moth bawl! 



A Household Ec. Senior strongly recommends dried eggs for camp 
cooking — they'd be so handy for baking powder biscuits, etc. 





PSYCHOLOGY 



Psychology's the subject grim, 
As all the seniors find, 
To brighten up the intellect 
And cultivate the mind. 



We learn among the lesser facts 
(The whole escapes me now) 
A concept of the twoness of 
That purple concrete cow. 







On Thomas and the kittens three 
And English Sparrow Jones 
We ponder till our weary minds 
Are dry as dusty bones. 



So mem'ries, percepts, visions of 

The Jersey cow and calf 

Float through our heads, and in our dreams 

We see the young giraffe. 



Chirp sadly, English Sparrow Jones, 
Farewell, dear purple cow, 
No hope is left, dear young giraffe, 
For Ethics has us now ! 






ihe jffirrorosjl 




DREAMS 




Did uou. euer dream of so au/fui a, quiz,, 
Tkat fron\ terror uoa fell thru the floor 

with, a vuUiz? 




Or that all uivprtpare<3l ijou uiert calUA to recitt 
And |flt UV,t a <io-nKei< and Ml A *otVv,g 



Sit is said tKat in woW-marei a Witms Wows 




h All muddled ana WisXeA, ^ cr fiwg-er-* 
v turned thumbs ! 



But there's one cLveam that's \>Iiss|>jI, 

for iuh.it h utp aU prau,, 
The angelic" sensation o"| sampVs ivjitVm?^. 





he fflxtwtmffl^x 



EVOLUTION 





THE BALLAD OF "ELSIE" SMITH 



You say that typewriting is hard 
And transcripts awful things to do, 
But if you were an "Elsie" Smith 
You'd find you'd have your troubles, too. 



You'd have to stand for bangs all day 
Until you'd wish that you were dead, 
And e'en when put away at night 
You'd have to stand upon your head. 



You'd feel the anxious Sophomore 
Jam paper in you, ream on ream, 
And then she'd pull it out again 
Until, if you could scream, you'd scream. 



Since you could not, you'd vent your spite 
In ways discreet, yet quite complete. 
You'd stick a space, then skip a space, 
And ruin every single sheet. 



And yet, the Sophomore'd be best. 
And first she'd keep you clean and neat. 
She'd look upon you, too, with awe, 
And, as you know, respect is sweet. 



The Junior is not half so nice — 
She's lost respect and neatness, too. 
At first she'd clean you once a week, 
But later, once a month would do. 



The Senior'd always come in haste, 
Her war-cry ever "Speed! More Speed!' 
She'd rush upon you in a whirl 
And shake you like a broken reed. 



She'd stay with you whene'er she could- 
If you had nerves they'd be in pieces, 
For when she'd nothing else to do 
She'd sit and copy silly theses. 



So, Junior, or whoe'er you be, 
A Senior, Soph, or College Grad, 
(Thanks be! the Freshman lets us rest) 
Pray, just recall, our lot is sad, 



And change that look of bitter hate 
To one of tender pity, do. 
You're not the only one to moan, 
We typewriters have troubles, too. 





We heard a man the other day 
Express the clever notion, 
That in his mind the Turkey Trot 
The poultry was of motion. 



SYSTEM 

Every day I go to school 
And try to keep 'most every rule, 
And every day when I feel good 
I go to Coolidge after food. 

The child who cuts her classes here 
Will get an "unallowed," I fear. 
She is a naughty child, I'm sure, 
And her excuse is very poor. 



I SHOULD WORRY 



I should worry like a chemical theory and be exploded. 

I should worry like the college clock and be run down. 

I should worry like the Microcosm and get sold. 

I should worry like a Y. W. C. A. meeting and choose a hymn. 

I should worry like the Mandolin Club and get all strung up. 




xrroros 




1 


D UZ2LI 


NO. 2 




A 


"R 


H 


? 


Q 


E 


I 


Z 


"R 


Y 


L 


X 


B 


E 


I 


N 


R 


B 


D 


F 


E 


M 


A 


W 


C 


I 


J 


M 


<S 


u 


D 


E 


K 


L 


T 


V 



PUZZLt NO 3 




Puzzle No. I 

Any person contriving to pass from 
A to B.S. within a period of four 
years will send solution to the Puzzle 
Department, Microchaos, and receive 
a reward of $100,000,000 (or less). 



Puzzle No. II 

Begin in the left hand column, near 
the upper corner and, spelling diag- 
onally, learn why you never should 
have gone to that luncheon last week. 



Puzzle No. Ill 
What is lacking in this picture? 



Puzzle No. IF 

My First is a letter that often is 

dropped 
In English that's not of the best. 
My Second's an article, Third is a 

drink — 
(I'll take one more cup if I'm 

pressed.) 
My Fourth is a body of water quite 

large. 
My First a good Fifth one will make. 
My whole is a teacher of Cookerv 

III— 
Pray, pardon the freedom I take. 



175 




Ibe jlirvof osjfe lt 



OUR COMPLIMENTS TO 

The Social Bu-fJer^ly takes 








X jflir roc o; - 




THE LITERAL MINDED 



The Znsti-ucTor Told Theni^M^ ro ughly i^haT to exfoecT 071 
fhei^ examinations^ Vj^f'-:^^^0^^^_ r ^__ 




7fJ]eSiqrnvQ Th 



fibril 2H The Junior Loses H fr Trai n 




Literature on theTveolTfscandencu 




7T Sen tor To /res a?i J?7le re sT< "^ 
1 TosiTion 





In winter I get up by bells 

And dress in haste with shrieks and yells. 

In summer, quite the other way, 

My dressing may take all the day. 

I may not rise till after eight, 
Yet no one seems to think it late. 
My breakfast is kept hot for me, 
And toast quite fresh and real coffee. 

And does it not seem hard to you, 
When I am tired and sleepy too, 
The rising bell should ring that way 
And wake me up at break of day? 



What did you have for lunch? 

A Simmons sandwich. 

What was it like? 

Oh, two attendance rolls with athletic meet between. 



FAVORITES IN MUSIC AND POETRY 

Chemistry Students: "Break, Break, Break!" 

Long Biology Students: "Oh, Where, Oh, Where Has My Little 
Dog Gone?" 

Cookery Students: Anything by Browning or Burns. 
History Students {during map quiz): "Somewhere." 
Flunkers: "Melody in F." 
Entire College: "Absent." 

178 



FAMILIAR TERMS— BIOLOGY 





CI UlilcL Ueoflt 



Waita T\odxL<jfcj 



CcrccL 




(X Jj CLcttnAxaL C au/nX 








179 





THE SIMMONS P.O. 

The most popular place that I know in our College 

Is not in the room where they deal us out knowledge. 

It is down at the foot of those tiresome stairs 

And along with the blackboards and 'phone booth and chairs. 

It is there that the mail's always brought every day. 

(Rest assured it is scanned in the carefullest way!) 

There are Woods and the 'phone girl and gossip quite rare, 

And the strangers make all their inquiries down there. 

So for all my spare minutes it's there I shall go — 

If you want me just ask at the Simmons P. O. 



Doctor (to run-down Freshman) : Just what is your condition; 
Freshman: History. — Why, how did you know? 



The Juniors thought of having Prom, at the Waldorf Astoria this 
year, but then they decided that after all the Copley Plaza was just a bit 
more convenient. 





be ffiinroros. 

BAD AND GOOD TASTE 






Davcincj 







m 






^ 



£*= iSS 




FATHER'S CHECK 

I thought of movies and a show, 
Of Bailey's for a sundae, 
And said, with satisfaction great, 
"I'll make it last till Monday." 

I went to school. "Please buy this book!" 

My hopes began to wither : 

The bookstore's in the basement, so 

I turned my footsteps thither. 

I bought the book, and then some more — 
They piled them all together, 
Till father's check was like the sun 
That fades in stormy weather. 

So father's check and chocolate fudge 
Alike were but a bubble : 
A small receipt "Pay to the Class," 
I got for all my trouble ! 

Uncle Sam's Bargain Day 

Business Manager of the Microcosm to the post-office clerk. How 
ich reduction can I get by buying two hundred postal cards? 

Oh, would I an amoeba were, 
Then I'd divide some day, 
And half of me would come to school, 
The other half would play. 




DORMITORY CROSS SECTION 

m 







dbf JffirTOf osjf 







-2>>i-cL aJ5^YYT.jaJ 



f 



NEVER A£A\K) I 



ABSENT 



I boldly climb the winding stair, 
For absences I do not care, 
My excuse, I know, is just and fair — 
Redeemable! 

With satisfaction great I see 
How well my statements do agree. 
Oh, well, at least it's sure to be 
Allowable ! 

The scene is changed. In doubt and fear 
The bulletin board I linger near. 
Ah ! tragic news that's written here — 
Unallowed ! 



Have you made fondant yet? 

No. Does that come under formaldehyde? 



What are you studying in Economics? 

The Grant twins — Emma Grant and Imma Grsn' 



Pupil at the sewing machine: Miss Spooner, I can't get this hemmer 
to make hemming stitches. All it does is to back-stitch. 

The young lady across the way looked into the biology lab. the other 
day, and said she didn't think it was always spring when the frogs croaked. 

AND THE PSYCH. THESIS ONLY TWO DAYS OFF! 

I beg your pardon, but will you spell for me? Now, I'll give you a 
word, and you tell me just as quickly as you can what you think of — hand- 
organ, iceberg, train, mumps, cabbage. Will you please look at this while 
I count three and then tell me what you remember? Are you musical? 
Why did you come to Simmons? Learn this poem in as short a time as 
possible and tell me how you did it. How do you think of the days of 
the week? Have a piece of candy — why did you take that one? Taste 
this, look at that picture, and say the first thing that comes into your head. 



SENSATIONS 





Alas ! that this freshman so small, 
Thus trembling and awe-struck should fal 
She fears we would tread 
On her poor little head, 
But it really is not so at all. 



She grows to a soph'more quite grand, 
And her chest — just you watch it expand ! 
The freshmen she eyes 
From a throne in the skies, 
And wears crowns with the largest size band. 





Oh, hush ! Whisper low what we say, 
For a junior we see her today. 

One walks on one's toes 

Wherever one goes. 
(But not the instructors, not they!) 



At last a brave senior we see, 
Now sinking, now swimming is she, 
She must struggle and fight 
With the goal well in sight, 
For she's bound she will get her degree. 



187 



1914 ^tattattra 




When you utter the word "statistics" to anyone 
in the Simmons world you see horror spread from 
brow to brow. The Household Economics girl pon- 
ders painfully upon dizzy charts, the Library girl 
upon afternoons spent in distant parts of the "B. P. 
L.," and the Secretarial girl — where is she? Tabu- 
lation-mad, she has already taken to her heels. These 
statistics, however, never have been and never will be 
either "chartered" or tabulated, and if you wish to 
share them with the book-worms of the "B. P. L.," 
that is your fault and not ours. 



THE BEST NATURED 

It has impressed us very greatly that the girl who 
has had to manage the class for a whole semester 
should still receive the honor of being voted the best 
natured person in 19 14. Such, however, is Ava's 
distinction, and so, if we did not live in the Fenway, 
we should certainly take our hats off to her. 




THE HARDEST WORKER 

We also feel the deepest respect for Margery M. 
Smith, and are sorry that we cannot afford to award 
her a prize for being the hardest worker in the class. 
If we think that we are driven, what would be our 
state of mind if we were as conscientious as she? As 
for the prize — well, Margery is interested in the 
Endowment Fund too, so she will understand that 
under the watchful eye of the Sophomores there is 
seldom a slip 'twixt the cent and the strip. 



THE MOST EXTRAVAGANT 

Speaking of financial matters make us think of 
the problem of extravagance at College. Although 
most of us may think of one particular girl as claim- 
ing distinction in this line, still is it quite possible that 
there is truth in the remark that every student is the 
most extravagant one — in the eyes of her own 
parents. 




THE BEST DRESSED 

Extravagance has nothing to do with being well 
dressed, for the latter, of course, is entirely due to 
instruction given in the A-i program. We had to 
call for a recount to determine whether Jennette Car- 
penter or Doris Ayer showed the better taste. There 
is one thing of which we are sure, and that is that 
we are all better dressed this year than we shall be 
next year when we are earning our own living. 



THE MOST VERSATILE 

We are taught that when that time comes we 
must cultivate versatility above all, for the more we 
know about the different phases of our work, the 
more successful we shall be. Such being the case, 
Jo Perry will never come to want, for not only can 
she speak on every subject imaginable, but she really 
understands what she is talking about. 





THE FASTEST TALKER 

Jo may be very clever at talking, but if Dr. El- 
dridge wishes the assistance of 19 14 in working up 
speed by dictation, we strongly advise him to call on 
Jennette. She is guaranteed to dictate at the rate 
of five hundred and fifty words a minute. 



THE CLEVEREST 

In spite of the fact that a large number of votes 
came in for Agnes Gartland as the cleverest girl, so 
many other votes cluttered up the ballot-box that we 
decided that we must be a pretty brilliant class after 
all. The Board rather regrets that more of the wit 
which was evidently displayed to others was not 
scribbled down and dropped into the Microcosm 
contribution box. 




THE FUNNIEST 

We never did quite understand the difference be- 
tween wit and humor, but we are sure that Margaret 
Potter abounds in the latter. If you do not believe 
it, just spend one of your spare week-ends on third 
floor South, and find out for yourself. 



THE LAZIEST 

It was appalling to find how few people had any 
opinion as to who was the laziest girl in our class. 
There seems to be a general feeling that anyone who 
was ever afflicted with that disorder has not remained 
at Simmons long enough to become a Senior. 



THE BIGGEST NUISANCE 

There was also some difficulty in deciding who 
was the biggest nuisance. Our class treasurer, Ruth 
Klein, has a most annoying and inconvenient way of 
asking for what we have not, and often the business 
manager of the Microcosm shows the same weak- 
ness. We have consequently concluded to ask the 
two most interested to toss up for the honor — heads, 
you win ; tails, I lose ! 




THE MOST CHEERFUL 

In spite of the "statistic" just mentioned, the ma- 
jority of the Seniors also consider Ruth the most 
cheerful member of the class. If she ever feels blue, 
she never shows it in anything but her wardrobe — 
come to think of it, perhaps that is why her clothes 
are always of that color. Would that we all had 
as simple a method. 





THE MOST TACTFUL 

Tact is a characteristic which all of us have notes 
about, but which few of us have found time to culti- 
vate. Marion Ostrander has been recognized by the 
world in general, and by 19 14 in particular, as one 
of the Seven Wonders in the art of diplomacy. On 
the other hand, we maintain that Babo has had more 
training than the rest of us, for she has been trying 
for the past three years to break it gently to people 
that she "is — no, a — not exactly er — a Freshman." 



THE BEST LOOKING 

There are many people who say that they cannot 
tell the difference between Paula Mueller and Edith 
Salisbury. We now have further proof of their 
similarity, for each of them was chosen by so many 
people for the best looking girl, that those of us who 
voted for ourselves are completely discouraged. 




THE MOST ORIGINAL SPELLER 

We anticipated that spelling would be a delicate 
point with many of the girls, but were pleasantly sur- 
prised to find that no one was at all reticent on the 
subject. Although Helene Boehmke has shown 
herself a candidate for the distinction of worst spel- 
ler (is it "heresy" or "harassy"?) Florence Gallant 
had so many votes that it seemed as if her friends ( ?) 
must have been inveigled into stuffing the ballot. She 
has passed the examination now, however, and feels 
the relief of no longer needing to know how to spell. 



THE FAVORITE AMUSEMENT 

Every conceivable form of amusement seems to be 
somebody's favorite, but dancing is in most cases the 
most popular. Two or three say that they enjoy 
more than anything else watching the other division 
march in Chapel. We suggest that during the re- 
mainder of the year they be self-sacrificing enough 
to forego that pleasure in order to lend support to 
their struggling classmates. 




THE MOST ATHLETIC 

Speaking of dancing and Chapel marching, we 
come to the consideration of our athletes. The vo- 
ting was very close for three girls — Lillian Nisbet, 
whose prominence in track work is recognized by all, 
and Tod Anderson, who for four years has been 
1914's tennis champion, and who, with Connie Ek- 
strand, the third candidate, has done wonders to gain 
for us the basketball cup. 



THE MOST POPULAR INSTRUCTOR 

It is quite impossible to decide upon a most popu- 
lar instructor, for there are far too many "in the 
running." We therefore offer the names of three — 
Dr. Farley, Miss Blood and Miss Craig. We did 
try to settle the question by ascertaining who had 
attended the most proms., but our last hopes were 
tragically dashed by finding that it was after all a tie 
between Miss Arnold and Mr. Goodell ! ! We con- 
sequently leave this question, feeling sure that after 
the Faculty has been duly petitioned (according 
to custom) the matter will be taken up and satisfac- 
torily decided for us at an early date. 




THE MICROCHAOS ADVERTISING SECTION 



Now since you want to pass with A's, 
The pride of all your mas and dads, 

We would suggest you straightway go 
To buy 
(This space to let for ads.) 



PASS YOUR EXAMS! 

USE 

ROYAL FAKING POWDER 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 

Why suffer with 
Alarm Clocks? 

TRY ONE OF OUR 

Stop 
Watches 

AND 

Insure a Good Night's 
Sleep 

APPLY AT THE 

SECRETARIAL OFFICE 



'THE 

SHORTHAND 

WRITER" 

BUY ONE AND SET IT TO 
WORK! 

A RAGEY MAGAZINE 



MACK LAUGHLIN'S 

Fountain 



Pen 



'Hasn't Scratched Yet!" 



PUMICE PREMIUM WITH EVERY 
PURCHASE 



THE MICROCHAOS ADVERTISING SECTION 



KNOX 
GERMANIN 

Add Hot Water and serve 



USE OUR 



Taughture 

PUT UP BY THE 

GROSSLAFF & GO. COLLEGE CANNING CO. 

57 Varieties 



DON'T SHOUT 

... USE ... 

ROARLY'S 
EAR DRUM 

Another practical suggestion for 
those who wish to hear themselves 
think in the lunchroom. 



(and then some) 



Compliments 

of 

Mike R. O'Kosm 



VOTES FOR WOMEN 

Become Familiar with the Conditions of Your Country 

TAKE 

ECONOMICS 



Testimonial: — Three years ago I took your course. Since then I 
have taken no other.— Ima F. Lunker. 



THE MICROCHAOS ADVERTISING SECTION 



Blue Labor Ketchup dowt worry and eret 



(MAKE-UP EXAMS BEGIN 


LET THE 


APRIL 8) 


GO DUST TWINS 


Repeat applications until relieved 


DO YOUR WORK 


Mothers Recommend It 


GUARANTEED TO REMOVE ALL 




OBJECTIONABLE MARKS 






NOTANY COMPANY 






Don't Clutter Up Your Office 






OPENING FOR 


See Yourselves as Others 


THEME INSTRUCTORS 


See You 


WE OFFER 


We Have a FACULTY for this Work 


THE ONLY WAY OUT 
COLLEGE WASTEPAPER CO. 


Special Opportunities 






Offered in 


BUY THIS LITTLE BOOK 



February and June 



300 THE PENWAY 
BOSTON 



"How to be Happy 
Though Educated" 

NEEDED IN EVERY ROOM 



SIMWAY BOOK CO. 



196 



THE MICKOCII AOS ADVERTISING SECTJOX 



Make Mary a Lady ! 

PUT ONE PENNY IN YOUR 

STRIP EACH DAY AND 

SEND YOUR LITTLE SISTER 

TO 

THE NEW DORMITORY 

The Best in the Country 


Kill or Care 

WHEN DRIVEN TO 

DRINK 

WITH NOTHING 
TO DO 

TRY OUR REMEDY 




NO FAILURE HAS EVER BEEN 
RECORDED 




FOR SALE — A vacuum lesson ab- 
sorber. 


1914 Shock Absorber 


LOST — My patience and my temper, 
somewhere in Room 114, sometime between 
January 21 and February 1, 1914. 

B. WlLDEED. 




WANTED— A redeemable absence. 


ON THE 


WANTED — A yeast cake to raise the 
Endowment Fund. 


ROCKY ROAD TO LEARNING 

No More Jolts 


A Chance for Inventors ! 

WANTED — A phonograph, about one 
inch in diameter. It must contain a record 
which will last fifty minutes, and be sensi- 
tive enough to distinguish the voice of the 
instructor above all other atmospheric dis- 
turbances. 




" WILL THE STUDENT who found 
the loose money please return it to the In- 
formation Office." 




(feroii-foj*, 1914 

(§nv lina, tear Alma ffflat* r, brtailje 
A farewell wnro, anil yet at Ijeart 
Jffrnm all tlje laup ttfat thou Ijaat giuen 
We know tljat we neeo nener part. 



<3bou gatt'at a aljare of tljg great atrengtb. 
Sljat all am linea migljt truer be. 
Anb, grateful for tljia gift, we pray 
©ur lone mag abow in mark fnr tljre. 




lop Inok listen to mjj kit 
onerous umres \ht merchants srll 
tjoti mill finft a goo% storr 
Iff jjoull turn tfy pagts o'rr 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



The 

Byrd Studio 

1868 Massachusetts Avenue 

Tel. 1596 W Cambridge 

CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER 

A 

Artistic Portraiture 



Picture frames, bric-a-brac and hand- 
decorated cards for all occasions 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Three Important Reasons 

Why You Should Do Your 

Shopping in Bostons 

Greatest Store 



1 Two great buildings — over 21 acres of sell- 

ing space — are filled with practical mer- 
chandise at all times of the year. Convenient ar- 
rangement of merchandise and ample aisle room in 
both buildings assure most comfortable and satisfac- 
tory shopping. 



I 1 On account of our unequalled facilities we 

are the first to show the novelties of the 
season. Here also you are sure to find many things 
not obtainable elsewhere— especially in goods of for- 
eign manufacture. 



I I I You can read our advertisements, knowing 
that dependence can be placed in the goods 
offered. Exaggeration is something never allowed 
and every article must be up to our required high 
standard, or it would not be permitted in our stock — 
much less advertised. 



Jordan Marsh Company 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
MAKERS OF 

CAPS, GOWNS AND 
HOODS 

to the American Colleges and Universities 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contracts a Specialty 

CORRECT HOODS FOR ALL DEGREES — RICH ROBES FOR 
PULPIT AND BENCH 



1, Samples, Etc., on Request 



The Chas. H. Elliott Go. 

The Largest College Engraving 
House in the World 



COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS 

CLASS PINS 



Dance Program 

and 

Inflations 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Co.ers 


\ C n"l£,P 


/ Fraternity 

' and 

Class Inserts 
for Annuals 
Fraternity 
and Class 
Stationery 


Wedding 


nvitations and 


Calling Cards 




WORKS: 




17th STREET and LEHIGH AVE. 




Philadelphia, 


Pa. 



Thresher Bros. 

The Silk Store 

Exclusive Silks, Velvets, Spool 
Silks, Chiffons, Ribbons, Im- 
ported Broadcloths, Woolen 
Dress Goods, Millinery, Waists, 
Petticoats and Kimonos. 

Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

Thresher Building 

44-46 Temple Place 

Boston, Mass. 

Philadelphia Store, 1322 Chestnut Street 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




th* Electric City Engraving Co. 

B UFFALO, N.Y. 



WE MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK. 



Q 



=a 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Select Unusual Gifts at 

STOWELL'S 

"V^OU are invited to inspect 
•*■ our interesting display of 
merchandise suitable for 
Wedding, Birthday or Com- 
plimentary Gifts, and espe- 
cially mention 
GOLD JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS and PEARLS 

STERLING SILVERWARE 
CLOCKS and LAMPS 

MARBLES and BRONZES 



We make a specialty of Class Pin 
Designs and estimates furnished ( 




W^S^L 



24 WINTER STREET, BOSTON 



Mrs. Anna D. Cable 

2 Park Square 
Boston, Mass. 

Scientific Facial Massage and 
Scalp Treatment 

Manicuring and Chiropody 
Violet Ray 

Telephone Oxford 4467 W 



The Old Corner Book Store 

Incorporated 

Standard and New Books, Medical and 

Scientific Books, Prayer Books 

and Hymnals 



27 and 29 Bromfield Street, Boston 
Massachusetts : Tel. 7069 or 7070 Main 



Your Shoes 



Must Be Well-Fitting 

We assume the responsibility, 

and take pride in offering you 

a perfect fit 

The students of Simmons are urged to become 
familiar with our service 

Thayer McNeil Company 

47 Temple Place 15 West Street 



IN THE GYMNASIUM 
YOU WEAR OUR SUITS 

For the School Room try our 
Middy Blouses of Serge, Twill 
or Poplin, with Skirts to match 

You will also find all other requirements 

for School or Gymnasium in our 

Misses' Department 

R. H. Stearns & Company 



Established 1841 

Hathaway Go. 



Carpenters 
& Builders 



82 Charles Street 
boston 

Telephone Haymarket 1279 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



ARE YOU AFRAID OF THE DARK: 



money and general business efficiency by having 
the best modern office equipment? 

A. E. Martell Company 

Designers and Manufacturers 

LOOSE LEAF AND MANIFOLD BOOKS 



Telephone Oxford 4385-M 

The Exclusive Waist Shop 

WAISTS and DRESSES 



Rooms 324-325, Walker Building 
120 BOYLSTON STREET 

BOSTON - • MASS. 



Miss Mendelsohn 



F. H. HOUGHTON 
jflortst 

4 Park Street 
Boston 

'Phone, Haymarket 2311 and 2312 



THE FISK TEACHERS' AGENCY 

2A PARK STREET, BOSTON. MASS. 



New York. 156 Fifth Avenue 

Washington, 1847 U Street 

Chicago. 28 East Jackson Boulevard 

Denver. 317 Masonic Temple 

Portland. Ore.. 316 Journal Building 

Berkeiev. Cal.. 2161 Shattuck Avenue 

Los Angeles, 343 Douglas Building 



Send to any address above for Agency Manual and 
Registration Forms, free 



I Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co. j 

I are thoroughly equipped to supply 

Colleges, Schools, Institutions and 
all large users of the best quality 
of groceries from their wholesale 
store at 

i 222 SUMMER STREET 



(OPPOSITE SOUTH STATION; 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Harlan P. French, President 
A. B. French, Vice-President 
cent B. Fisk, Secretary and Manager 



THE ALBANY TEACHERS' AGENCY 

I NC. 

KNOWS HOW! 

Twenty-three Years of success- 
ful experience in bringing 
together 

Good Schools and 
Good Teachers 

Our Field : Public and Private Schools 

and Colleges ; we have filled positions in 

every State in the Union 

81 Chapel Street, Albany, N.Y. 

Send for Bulletin 



Tel. Oxford 4719 

ANNA ELYSA MAGMASTER 

[Assistant to the late Dr. Fred. W. Payne] 

REFRACTIONIST and OPTICIAN 

OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED 

149 Tremont Street, Room 512 
Lawrence Building, Boston 

Office Hours, 1 
Even 
REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST 



We make a Specialty of 

Engraved Invitations, Programs, 

Menus, Visiting Cards, 

Monogram and Address Dies 

EVERYTHING IN STATIONERY AND 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 



WARD'S 



57-61 FRANKLIN ST. 
BOSTON 



ARTHUR D. JONES 

Mason and 
Contractor 

Prompt Attention Givenjto Jobbing oi All Kinds 



76 KINGSTON STREET 
BOSTON 



Telephones : 2676 Oxford Home, 1165-4 Bellevue 



11647 



Smith Brothers 

Butler, Cheese and 
Eggs 



2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 

and Basement No. 3 
BOSTON . . MASS. 



Sole Receivers of 

Randolph Creamery 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



China and Glass 

The undersigned invite attention to their 
exhibits in this line, which include the 
best productions of the Potter's and 
Glass Maker's Art, gleaned by visits 
every season by our buyers to the best 
makers in Great Britain, France, Ger- 
many, Austria and America. 



Dinner Set Department 
Glassware Department 
Stock Pattern Department . 
Lamp Department 
Art Pottery, Wedding Gifts . 
Toilet Sets, Plant Pots, etc. 



3d Floor 
2d Floor 
4th Floor 

Gallery 
3d Floor 

Gallery 



Kitchen and Cooking Ware Dept. 4th Floor 

Visitors will find an extensive line 
of Students' Requisites 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Go. 

Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 



33 Franklin Street - Boston 

Near Washington and Summer Streets 



Telephone 3899- M Back Bay 

AMES &. GINTY 

GINTY ROOFING SHIELDS 

ROOFI NG 

SHEET METAL WORK 

FENWAY STATION, BACK BAY 
BOSTON, MASS. 

John Andrew Ginty 



DON'T PAY 

high prices for your suits when 
you can have them made at a fair 
price combined with first class 
workmanship. 

My selection of fabrics and fashions are 

now ready for your inspection 

DON'T DELAY — CALL TODAY 

A. AXELSON 

l_adios' Tailor 

4 FRANCIS ST., ROXBURY, Mass. Tel. 1 782-W Brook. 



Beattie & McGuire 

{Famous for Silks and Dress Goods) 
IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS OF 

SILKS 

Dress Goods, Linens, Wash Dress Fabrics 

also 

Silk Petticoats 

READY TO WEAR OR TO MEASURE 



I\OTE— Students of Simmons College will be allowed 
by us a Special Discount of 10% on all merchandise 
except during our Semi-annual Clearance Sales 



29 Temple Place 



Boston, Mass. 



Emerson's— TAKE ELEVATOF 
VIII 



Telephone 49 Oxford 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 





1 1 






^^^KENNtY&WATERBURY GMPANY, 




11111111 










S2^P^SSi n i£^BostoR.MaS 




1 1 





Chase Express Company 

Telephone 36 Brookline 



L. WHITE, Tailor 



CLEANSING and DYEING 



Monthly Pressing $1.50 

Clothes called for and delivered the same day. Auto Service. 

LADIES' ALTERATIONS A SPECIALTY 



290 Harvard Street 



TELEPHONE: 



Dkline 2856 W 

Coolidge Corner, Brookline 




D. B. UPDIKE 

Cfje 00errpmount press 

232 SUMMER ST. 
BOSTON 

PRINTER OF THE SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BULLETIN, &f THE PUBLICATIONS OF 
OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING 



Hcers and Students of Simmons College 

e invited to --visit the Press, opposite the 

South Station, Boston 



Brookline Riding School ™ E 




% First-class saddle horses and livery. «J Spec- 
ial attention given to ladies and children. Ifl Fin- 
est equipped riding school in New England, and 
so near the bridle path that Autos and Electrics 
are avoided. «J Horses boarded at reasonable 
rates, f Every effort will be made to please 
our patrons. Call brookline 1270 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



If you look 
You will find 



Dainty, interesting:, and yet 
very inexpensive things in 
dress fabrics, as well as made- 
up and ready-to-wear waists. 
Kimonos and Mandarin Coats 
at our Oriental Shop, Tre- 
mont, cor. West Streets. 



Walter M. Hatch & Go. 



Simmons Souvenirs 



Pennants f ^"'^) 75 cents 



3anners ( 



$1.50 



Simmons Seal Pins in $1.00 
Gold and Silver and upwards 

Simmons Writing- Tab- 
lets with printed seal 30 cents 

Die stamped paper in 
quire boxes with en- 
velopes 

40, 50 and 60 cents per box 

Pillows made to special order 



A. D. Maclachlan 

502 Bo>ls(on St. Boste 



Why pay the doctor? 

Plenty of GOOD FOOD and FRESH AIR 
costs less and is far more satisfactory. 
You can get both by doing your own 
MARKETING and buying of 

Weston-Thurston Co. 

BEEF VEAL LAMB PORK POULTRY 
BUTTER CHEESE EGGS 

Stalls 20, 22 & 24 New Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON. MASS. 



TWO TELEPHONES 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Telephone 1936 Oxford 



Miss Stevens' Business Agency 
Nurses' Directory and Teachers' 
Exchange 

L.S.STEVENS, A. M. 



Room 523 
The Walker Bldg. 



DlEGES & GLUST 

" If we made it, it 's right ' ' 

Class Pins Class Rings 

Fraternity Pins Medals and Cups 

149 Tremont Street 

BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 




We make a specialty of 

Original Hats 

Correctly Fitted 

SPECIAL RATES GIVEN TO OUR COLLEGE GIRLS 

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION 

Fannette Millinery 

7 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 




Packed in Parchment-lined 
One pound and half-pound Canisters 

We invite comparison with other 
Teas of the same or higher price 

S. S. PIERCE GO. 

BOSTON BROOKLINE 



(Announcement 

New and original designs of 
fashionable foreign models 
with some choice selections 
of the finest foreign fabrics 
are now ready for your 
selection. 

I will appreciate an early 
call. 

STORAGE OF FURS 
Also Furs repaired and remodeled 
during the spring and summer sea- 
son at half price. 



<C0a0. J), f)uruoi*c0 

LADIES' TAILOR 
31 West St. Boston, Mass. 

Telephone 4350 Oxford 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Indvidual Fitted 

PATTERNS 

Ladies are being fitted 


LOMBARD 

The Distinctive House for College Girls 
SPECIALTIES 

Mackinaws — Sport Coats 

Ulsters — Serge Middy Suits 

Sailor Blouses — Skirts 

Silk Shirts, Etc. 


to paper patterns of 
dresses and garments 
in latest Paris styles 
so that they are mak- 
ing up their materials 


Send for Illustrated Booklet 

HENRY S. LOMBARD 

22 to 26 MERCHANTS ROW BOSTON, MASS. 


Telephone, 3609 Back Bay 


without trying on . . 


B. F. Macy 

Formerly of F. A. Walker & Co. 


PARIS PATTERN 
SUPPLY CO. 


Kitchen Furnishings and 
Fireplace Fittings 


7 TEMPLE PLACE 

BOSTON, MASS. 


410 Boylston Street (near Berkeley St.) 
BOSTOX 






Dr. Moody 


We Are the Sole Boston Agents 
for 

Queen Quality 


DENTIST 


480 WASHINGTON ST. 


Shoes for 


Specialists in 


Women 


Bridgework 
Gum Section Plates 


$3.50 to $5.00 per pair 


Pyorrhoea 

and 

Regulating 


We carry styles for every 
occasion and they are noted 
for their comfort and unex- 
celled quality 


FEES MODERATE HOUHS 9 TO 6 
Phone Oxford 990 


C. F. Hovey & Go. 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



W. H. PRIOR 

DEALER IN 

MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 
POULTRY and GAME 

NEWPORT SAUSAGES 
A Specialty 

1-3-5-7 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Richmond j ^ 
W. H. Prior Everett Townsend 

Prior & Townsend 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all kinds of 

SEA FOOD 

121-131 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Richmond { }3§ 



Compliments of the 
Cambridge Laundry 



C. TESTA & Co., " 9 ,& E T K? s T f. EET 




J. SHORT & COMPANY 

JfutHljtimahle tCaMra' Sailors 

Fancy Dressmaking 
Perfect Fit Guaranteed 

SPECIAL PRICE TO STUDENTS 

132 Boylston St., - Boston, Mass. 

Smart Millinery Models 

for Spring and Summer wear. 
Orange Blossoms and Bridal Veils 



551 Boylston Street, - Copley Squan 
Over The Rosary Phone 5418 W Back Bay 



Reya Corset Shop 

159A Tremont St., Boston 
[ over Tuttle's ] 



CORSETS FITTED FROM 
$1.00 UP 

Formerly with C. F. Hovey & Co. 

MISS GEORGIA F. CLARK 

& LINGERIE SHOP £> 

Tailored Underwear 

in Muslin. Lawn and Crepe-de-Chine 

ALSO 

Hosiery, Silk Petticoats and 
Jersey Underwear 

Small expenses enable me to name very 
moderate prices 

159A TREMONT ST.- ROOM 16 
Phone 601 Oxford 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Cooking School 
Teachers 

generally use 

SLADE'S 

Spices and Specialties 

because Slade's are best and go farthest 

WESTFIELD 

lorses Slade's as Absolute- 
^liHJJjjtfjl and Chefs praise 

Ask for Slade's 

D, & L. Slade Co. 




BROWNING'S 
Ladies' Hairdressing Parlor 



Special Scalp Treatment for Removing 
Dandruff and Stop Falling Hair 

Pimples and Blackheads Removed 



Opening Spring Sale of 

LADIES' SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

At wholesale prices. All shoes guaranteed 

Colonial Evening Slipper in 
Patent Leather, Kid and Sat- 
in, with French heel, regu- 
larly sold forf 4.00, now S2.25. 

$4.00 shoes, with famous Kid- 
ney heel, S2.50 

Mary F. Shay's Sample Shoe Shop 

Sample Shoes 7 Temple Place 



C. S. Day & Co. 

ESTABLISHED 1898 

Fruits, Meats & Vegetables 

:-: Family Trade a Specialty :-: 

6 &7 New Faneuil Hall Market 

North Side 

BOSTON 

f 1526 

Telephone. Richmond J. 1527 



25 TEMPLE PLACE [Room 41-42) 
Telephone Oxford 4587 M 


JulHffi 




FACIAL AND SCALP TREATMENT 




Shampooing 50c Massaging 50c 
Manicuring 50c Marcel Wave 50c 
Children's Haircutting Chiropody 

HAIR DYEING 


Compliments 

of a 

Friend 


Hair Goods of Every Description 
Made to Order 


w 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Important Announcement to Music Teachers 

MUSIC TEACHERS! Send the name of the firm 
with whom you are now dealing and we will arrange to have 
a package of our new music sent "on approval." 

Why not send your name at once, and we will take pleasure in forwarding to you — 
postage paid— a copy of our comptete Catalog, also our THEMATIC CATALOGS 
of EASY TEACHING MUSIC for the PIANOFORTE. Also our Latest Com- 
plete Catalog of "EDI HON WOOD" and Song Catalog. 

The B. F. Wood Husic Company 



246 Summer Sir 

BOSTON 



29 West 38th Street 
NEW YORK 




NEW HOME 
CHAIN STITCH 
AUTOMATIC 




NEW HOME 

ROUND BOBBIN 

ROTARY 



GET A 

NEW HOME 
SEWING MACHINE 



"The Machine of 

The Guarantee Never Rui 



MADE IN NEW ENGLAND 

Factory at Orange, Mass. 



Superior to all others in Quality 
and Simplicity. Sews where others 
fail. Its patented Double Feed sews 
thin or thick goods with equal pre- 
cision. 

Adapted by Boston, Milton, Newton, 
Wellesley and other leading New Eng- 
land cities and towns for school use. 
The NEW HOME MACHINE is sold 
strictly on its merits. No Club Schemes 
or Door-to-Door Canvassers Employed. 

CASH OR SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



*2: 



00 DOWN 



| .00 A WEEK 



Ho 



Your old machine taken In exchange 

as First Payment. 

New Sewing Machines Rented. 

All Makes Repaired. 

Needles and OH For All Machines. 






NEW HOME 

LONG SHUTTLE 

VIBRATOR 



C. C. BOWLES & CO. 

°E2? 37 BEDFORD STREET 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



i Poultry Dressing Plant Sausage Factory and Smoke Houses 

ih Centre Street, Boston Blackstone and North Streets 

Curing Plants, Boston and Chicago 

BATCHELDER & SNYDER COMPANY 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 

(Wholesale Only) 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sausages, 

Poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Olive Oils 



Makers of Snyder-Cure 



and bacon: smoked with corncobs. 



MASS. 



Compliments of a Friend 



Since the 



Show Case 



is run for the benefit of the 



Student Guild 



be sure to buy there 
whenever you can. 



Official 
Simmons College 

Jewelry 



Manufactured by 



Bent & Bush Company 



flags -Banners 



338 Washington Street 
Boston, Mass. 




It's Like Magic to Her. 

"I never supposed when I was a girl that some day I could take a powder, put 
it in a little hot water, let it cool, and have a dessert so delicious that it would make 
one's mouth water to think 
anything better than those 



>f it. I'm a good cook, but I've never been able to make 



JELM) 



Jell-O and 
simple and 

used Jell-O 



desserts. JusT: think what one can do with a ten-cent packa 
Jell-O! 

"The plain Jell-O, the Jell-O and fruit, th 
whipped cream, and Jell-O in a hundred forms — all 
easy to make. It seems like magic to me." 

She has told it all, and every woman who hi 
will agree with her. 

Cost, 10 cents. Time of making, one minute. 

Seven pure fruit flavors : Strawberry, Orange, Lemon, 
Raspberry, Cherry, Peach, Chocolate. 

Each in a separate package, 10c. at any grocer's. 

A beautiful new Recipe Book, with brilliantly colored 
pictures by Rose Cecil O'Neill, author and illustrator of "The 
Kewpies," will be sent free to all who write and ask us 
lor it. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD CO., Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburs, Can. 

The name JELL-O is on every package in big- red letters. If it 
isn't there, it isn't Jeel-O. 




376.? 
S jll 






FOR C1RCUUATION